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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CLINICAL NUTRITION IN CHILDREN Title: Exposing college students to exercise: the training interventions and genetics of exercise response (TIGER) study

Authors
item Sailors, Mary -
item Jackson, Andrew -
item Mcfarlin, Brian -
item Turpin, Ian -
item Ellis, Kenneth -
item Foreyt, John -
item Hoelscher, Deanna -
item Bray, Molly -

Submitted to: Journal of American College Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2010
Publication Date: July 1, 2010
Citation: Sailors, M.H., Jackson, A.S., Mcfarlin, B.K., Turpin, I., Ellis, K.J., Foreyt, J.P., Hoelscher, D.M., Bray, M.S. 2010. Exposing college students to exercise: the training interventions and genetics of exercise response (TIGER) study. Journal of American College Health. 59(1):13-20.

Interpretive Summary: Oftentimes during the first years in college, young adults may have a tendency to gain weight, partly due to less physical activity. In this study, inactive college students enrolled in an exercise program, called the TIGER (Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response) study, which included regular physical activity for 30 weeks during the year, 3 days/week, for 40 minutes at about 75% of their maximum heart rate based on age and gender. Of the more than 1500 students initially enrolled, about 55% were considered to be overweight, and about 22% obese based on their weight for height. At the end of one semester, about 68% of the students were still participating in the exercises, but by the end of the second semester (30 weeks), only about 20% remained. It was concluded that the TIGER study presented a successful approach for introducing college-aged individuals to regular aerobic exercise, but additional strategies are needed to keep the students coming back.

Technical Abstract: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age 18 to 35 years, participated in the study. Subjects underwent 30 weeks of exercise training, 3 days/week, for 40 minutes at 65% to 85% of age- and gender-predicted maximum heart rate reserve. Multiple measures of body size/composition, heart rate, and blood pressure were obtained. A total of 1,567 participants, (39% male), age 18 to 35 years, participated in the TIGER study. The prevalence of overweight/obesity in participants was 48.0%/19.3% in non-Hispanic Whites, 55.3%/24.2% in Hispanic Whites, 54.9%/25.4% in African Americans, and 38.3%/11.3% in Asians. Average within-semester retention was 68%, but overall retention (30 weeks, 2 semesters) was 20%. The TIGER study represents an efficacious strategy for introducing college-aged individuals to regular aerobic exercise.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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