Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HIGHER DIPTERA PESTS OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY: SCREWWORM FLIES

Location: Screwworm Research

Title: Genetic variability of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the Western Hemisphere

Authors
item Belay, Difabachew -
item Clark, Pete -
item Skoda, Steven
item Isenhour, David -
item Foster, John -

Submitted to: Entomology Society America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: February 27, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) is a migratory and polyphagous pest of both cultivated and uncultivated plant species in the Western Hemisphere. We investigated the genetic diversity of FAW by collecting 31 representative samples from the United States, Argentina, Panama, and Puerto Rico using amplified fragment length polymorphism. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that the majority (71.2%) of the total genetic variation was within populations; the remaining 28% of the variation was among populations within a region. Similarly, dendrograms of results from cluster analysis showed the lack of regional genetic structuring. Moreover, the isolation by distance analysis indicated that there is no significant correlation between genetic dissimilarity and geographic distance. These results imply that gene flow occurs between these populations. This is important information when developing pest management strategies or in tracking or combating insecticide resistance in FAW.

Technical Abstract: The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) is a migratory and polyphagous pest of both cultivated and uncultivated plant species in the Western Hemisphere. We investigated the genetic diversity of FAW by collecting 31 representative samples from the United States, Argentina, Panama, and Puerto Rico using amplified fragment length polymorphism. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that the majority (71.2%) of the total genetic variation was within populations; the remaining 28% of the variation was among populations within a region. Similarly, dendrograms of results from cluster analysis showed the lack of regional genetic structuring. Moreover, the isolation by distance analysis indicated that there is no significant correlation between genetic dissimilarity and geographic distance. These results imply that gene flow occurs between these populations. This is important information when developing pest management strategies or in tracking or combating insecticide resistance in FAW.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page