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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES FOR PASTURES AND RANGELANDS IN THE TEMPERATE SEMIARID REGIONS OF THE WESTERN U.S.

Location: Forage and Range Research

Title: Discussion of submitted posters for Section 2.3 (Rangeland Germplasm Resources)

Authors
item Johnson, Douglas
item DE Battista, Jose -

Submitted to: International Rangeland Congress
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 4, 2011
Publication Date: March 31, 2011
Citation: Johnson, D.A., De Battista, J.P. 2011. Discussion of submitted posters for Section 2.3 (Rangeland Germplasm Resources). In: Feldman, S.R., G.E. Oliva, and M.B. Sacide (eds.). Diverse Rangelands for a Sustainable Society. International Rangeland Congress, Rosario, Argentina.

Interpretive Summary: As part of the IX International Rangeland Congress held in Rosario, Argentina, a total of 70 posters from 17 countries were submitted to Section 2.3 (Rangeland Germplasm Resources). These posters documented plant germplasm research conducted in five major regions of the world: South America, North America, Africa, Asia, and Mideast. Submitted posters covered a wide range of topics from initial collection and evaluation of rangeland plants to seed production and actual use in rangeland revegetation and restoration projects. Research was reported for a wide diversity of rangeland plant species including grasses, legumes, shrubs, and trees. The studies contributed to a better understanding of how rangeland plant species can be used to improve degraded rangelands around the world. Careful stewardship of rangeland plants is essential to ensure that rangelands in the U.S. and around the world can be used sustainably in the face of global change and increasing human impacts.

Technical Abstract: As part of the IX International Rangeland Congress held in Rosario, Argentina, a total of 70 posters from 17 countries were submitted to Section 2.3 (Rangeland Germplasm Resources). These posters documented research conducted in five major regions of the world: South America, North America, Africa, Asia, and Mideast. The submitted posters were classified into five major themes that included: I) Germplasm Collection; II) Soil and Plant Community Associations; III) Germplasm Evaluation; IV) Herbicides, Fertilizer and Microbial Effects; and V) Seed Production, Sowing and Germination. The Germplasm Evaluation theme was further subdivided into five sub-themes: A) Morphological and Physiological Traits; B) Molecular Characterization; C) Combined Morpho-Physiological Traits and Molecular Characterization; D) Stress Resistance; and E) Forage Quality and Feed Intake. Submitted posters covered a wide range of topics from initial collection and evaluation to seed production and actual use in rangeland revegetation and restoration projects. Research was reported for a wide diversity of rangeland plant species including grasses, legumes, shrubs, and trees. The diverse studies reported in Session 2.3 contributed towards a better understanding of how rangeland plant species can be utilized to improve degraded rangelands around the world. Although particular species differ from location to location, the principles involved in the collection, evaluation, and utilization of rangeland germplasm resources can be applied across locations. Working together with our valuable germplasm resources, we can ensure that rangelands from around the world can be used sustainably in the face of global change and increasing human impacts.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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