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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VINEYARD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND THE QUALITY OF GRAPES AND GRAPE PRODUCTS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Title: Characterization of a novel anthocyanin profile in wild black raspberry mutants: an opportunity for studying the genetic control of pigment and color

Authors
item Dossett, Michael -
item Lee, Jungmin
item Finn, Chad

Submitted to: Journal of Functional Foods
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2011
Citation: Dossett, M., Lee, J., Finn, C.E. 2011. Characterization of a novel anthocyanin profile in wild black raspberry mutants: an opportunity for studying the genetic control of pigment and color. Journal of Functional Foods. 3:207-214.

Interpretive Summary: Anthocyanins (natural pigments; phytochemicals) are important quality indicators in red colored fruit and are regularly cited for their potential health benefits. We report on our newly discovered black raspberry mutants, the fruits of which lack certain anthocyanins compared to classic black raspberries. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first black raspberry variants reported in the literature with this unique anthocyanin profile. Their mutation offers a possible key to deciphering genetic control of rutinoside glycosylation in anthocyanin biosynthesis.

Technical Abstract: The type and amount of anthocyanins in raspberries, and other small fruits, has recently received increased attention. Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.), in particular, has long been recognized as a rich source of anthocyanins and has been the focus of many recent studies examining their potential health benefits. In this study, we characterize a novel anthocyanin profile found in seedlings of two wild black raspberry populations collected from South Dakota, USA. Seedlings from these populations lack pigments glycosylated with rutinoside in their fruit, have elevated levels of cyanidin-3-sambubioside, and contain a small but significant amount of pelargonidin-3-glucoside, a pigment reported only once previously in black raspberry. Affected fruit also have lower than typical total anthocyanins (77.5 to 134.4 mg·100 mL-1). Based on the available evidence, we believe the plants have a mutation in the gene encoding anthocyanidin-3-glycoside rhamnosyltransferase (3RT), providing a unique opportunity to identify and study one of the major genes in the anthocyanin pathway and its effect on fruit anthocyanins and color.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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