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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Intake of added sugars is not associated with weight measures in children 6 to 18 years: NHANES 2003–2006

Authors
item Oneil, Carol -
item Nicklas, Theresa -
item Zanovec, Michael -
item Liu, Yan -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2010
Publication Date: April 24, 2010
Citation: O'Neil, C., Nicklas, T., Zanovec, M., Liu, Y. 2010. Intake of added sugars is not associated with weight measures in children 6 to 18 years: NHANES 2003–2006 [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 24:560.5.

Technical Abstract: The association between intakes of added sugars and weight measures in children continues to be under scrutiny because the evidence is inconclusive. This study examined the association between intake of added sugars and five weight measures using a nationally representative sample of children. NHANES, 2003–2006, 24-hour recall data from children aged 6–18 years (n equals 3,136) were used in the analyses. USDA’s definition of added sugars and MyPyramid Equivalents Database were used to estimate daily intake. Multiple linear regression and squared partial correlation coefficients were used to estimate the strength of association between weight, body mass index, waist circumference, triceps skinfold, and subscapular skinfold as dependent variables with added sugars as the independent variable. Covariates included age, gender, race-ethnicity, poverty income ratio, total energy intake (kcals), and physical activity. Mean intake of added sugars was 21 tsp accounting for 16 percent of total kcals. The percent variance explained in the weight measures ranged from 18 percent to 59 percent; with none of the variance explained by intakes of added sugars. No significant associations were observed between intakes of added sugars and weight measures. Results are limited to cross-sectional comparisons and the assessment measures used. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the findings.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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