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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA (XF) AND OTHER EXOTIC AND INVASIVE DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS

Location: Crop Diseases, Pests and Genetics

Title: Management of insect-transmitted plant pathogens: defining conditions for successful roguing with a spatially-explicit simulation model

Author
item Sisterson, Mark

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2011
Publication Date: March 15, 2011
Citation: Sisterson, M.S. 2011. Management of insect-transmitted plant pathogens: defining conditions for successful roguing with a spatially-explicit simulation model. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, March 27-30, 2011, Waikoloa, HI. p. 113-114.

Technical Abstract: Roguing (the replacement of infected plants with healthy plants) is commonly used to manage the spread of insect-transmitted plant pathogens. Roguing has two potential benefits. First, removing an infected plant eliminates a source of inoculum, potentially slowing pathogen spread. Second, as infected plants often die or produce reduced yields, replacing an infected plant with a healthy plant may increase economic returns. Whether or not the benefits of roguing are realized depends on characteristics of the pathosystem and the efficiency of the roguing program. To better understand how characteristics of the pathosystem and roguing program interact to affect pathogen spread, a spatially-explicit simulation model was constructed. Sensitivity analyses indicated that roguing slowed pathogen spread provided that infected plants were removed shortly after inoculation and that roguing was coordinated over large spatial scales. The extent to which roguing increased yields depended on assumptions associated with yield loss due to infection and rates of pathogen spread. In cases where infected plants produced no useable yield, roguing generally increased yield. In cases where infected plants produced useable yields, some parameter combinations resulted in scenarios where roguing decreased yield.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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