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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESEARCH, ACQUISITION, MANAGEMENT, AND DOCUMENTATION OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES Title: Allium acuminatum Seed Production: First Look at Cultural Parameters

Authors
item Hellier, Barbara
item Johnson, Richard

Submitted to: Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: February 2, 2010
Publication Date: April 2, 2010
Citation: Hellier, B.C., Johnson, R.C. 2010. Allium acuminatum Seed Production: First Look at Cultural Parameters. Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project. FY 2009 Progress Report.

Interpretive Summary: This is a report on the first year data for a two year project assessing seed production parameters for the native forb Allium acuminatum. As a component of greater sage-grouse and Southern Idaho ground squirrel habitat, Allium acuminatum Hook. (Taper-tip onion) has been targeted for use in restoration projects. Before A. acuminatum can be used for restoration projects an understanding of how to make quantities of propagules available is needed. Either dormant bulbs or true seed may be viable options for taper-tip onion stand establishment. For use of either type of propagule, quantities of true seed will be needed. The objective of this project was to look at production parameters needed to grow A. acuminatum for a seed crop. A. acuminatum bulbs were hand and mechanically planted at two within row densities: one inch and two inches. The results show that mechanically planting mature bulbs of taper-tip onion is an efficient planting method for seed and bulb production. Bulbs can be spaced 1 inch apart for maximum seed production but a wider between bulb spacing is needed for maximum larger (7-15mm) diameter bulb production. Bulb survival and propagule production was achieved in an agricultural setting for this wild species.

Technical Abstract: This is a report on the first year data for a two year project assessing seed production parameters for the native forb Allium acuminatum. As a component of greater sage-grouse and Southern Idaho ground squirrel habitat, Allium acuminatum Hook. (Taper-tip onion) has been targeted for use in restoration projects. Before A. acuminatum can be used for restoration projects an understanding of how to make quantities of propagules available is needed. Either dormant bulbs or true seed may be viable options for taper-tip onion stand establishment. For use of either type of propagule, quantities of true seed will be needed. The objective of this project was to look at production parameters needed to grow A. acuminatum for a seed crop. A. acuminatum bulbs were hand and mechanically planted at two within row densities: one inch and two inches. The results show that mechanically planting mature bulbs of taper-tip onion is an efficient planting method for seed and bulb production. Bulbs can be spaced 1 inch apart for maximum seed production but a wider between bulb spacing is needed for maximum larger (7-15mm) diameter bulb production. Bulb survival and propagule production was achieved in an agricultural setting for this wild species.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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