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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management Practices to Mitigate Global Climate Change, Enhance Bio-Energy Production, Increase Soil-C Stocks & Sustain Soil Productivity...

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Studies on removing sulfachloropyridazine from groundwater with microbial bioreactors

Authors
item Hunter, William
item Shaner, Dale

Submitted to: Current Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 6, 2011
Publication Date: February 1, 2011
Citation: Hunter, W.J., Shaner, D.L. 2011. Studies on removing sulfachloropyridazine from groundwater with microbial bioreactors. Current Microbiology. 62(2):1560-1564.

Interpretive Summary: The antibiotic sulfachloropyridazine (SCP) is used in both aquiculture and animal husbandry. Because of this use it is sometimes encountered as a contaminant in surface or groundwaters. This study evaluated two types of microbial reactors as techniques for removing SCP from water. One type of reactor that was evaluated was a nitrogen-limiting biobarrier similar to one that we previously used to remove atrazine from a simulated groundwater. The other biobarrier studied was a slow-sand-filter. Results showed that the nitrogen-limiting biobarrier was not very effective at removing SCP from flowing water. When water containing 2.4 mg L-1 SCP was pumped through the nitrogen-limiting biobarrier only about 0.6 mg L-1 SCP or about 28% of that present initially was removed. Much better removal was obtained with the slow-sand-filter which reduced the SCP levels from 2.35 to 0.048 mg L-1, a removal efficiency of ~ 98%. High levels of nitrate nitrogen, 50 mg L-1 N, did not interfere with the removal processes of either reactor suggesting that SCP was not being degraded as a microbial nitrogen source.

Technical Abstract: Sulfachloropyridazine (SCP), an antibiotic that is used in aquiculture and as a feed additive in animal husbandry, is a commonly encountered contaminant in surface and groundwaters. Two types of microbial reactors were evaluated as methods for removing SCP from flowing water. One type of reactor evaluated was a nitrogen-limiting biobarrier; the other a slow-sand-filter. Results showed that the soybean oil based nitrogen-limiting biobarrier was not very effective at removing SCP from flowing water. When supplied with flowing water containing 2.4 mg L-1 SCP the nitrogen-limiting biobarrier removed ~ 0.6 mg L-1 SCP or about 28% of that present. Much better removal was obtained with the slow-sand-filter which reduced the SCP levels from 2.35 to 0.048 mg L-1, a removal efficiency of ~ 98%. High levels of nitrate nitrogen, 50 mg L-1 N, did not interfere with the removal processes of either reactor suggesting that SCP was not being degraded as a microbial nitrogen source.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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