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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PESTS, PARASITES, DISEASES AND STRESS OF MANAGED HONEY BEES USED IN HONEY PRODUCTION AND POLLINATION

Location: Honey Bee Research

Title: Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of fungal isolates for use against the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida)

Authors
item Kanga, Lambert -
item Aronstein, Katherine
item Somorin, A -
item Murray, Daniel -

Submitted to: Biocontrol
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 18, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The small hive beetle (SHB) cadavers were collected from several apiaries in Florida. Sample analysis revealed that these collections harbor a mixture of fungi, including the two primary entomopathogens. These two entomopathogens were tested against larvae and adult beetles using spray tower bioassays and soil bioassays. Mortality of SHB larvae and adult SHBs are reported. Overall, the data provide useful insights for the potential application of fungal pathogens as soil treatments that could substantially alter the life cycle of SHB by preventing emergence of adults. This strategy could serve as a major component in the development of an integrated pest management program for SHB.

Technical Abstract: The analysis of DNA sequences from fungal pathogens obtained from cadavers of the small hive beetle (SHB) collected from several apiaries in Florida revealed a mixture of saprobes and two potential primary entomopathogens, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana. Spray tower bioassays indicated the LC50 for M. anisopliae was 0.8 x 106 and 1.0 x 104 conidia ml-1 for larvae and adults respectively. The LC50 for B. bassiana was 1.0 x 107 and 2.0 x 104 conidia ml-1 for larvae and adults respectively. In soil bioassays, mortality of SHB larvae due to M. anisopliae at 1.0 x 107 conidia ml-1 ranged from 54% at day 7 to 100% at day 21. The isolate of B. bassiana also caused 25% and 100% larval mortality 7 and 21 days post-treatment, respectively. Overall, the data provide useful insights for the potential application of fungal pathogens as soil treatments that could substantially alter the life cycle of SHB by preventing emergence of adults. This strategy could serve as a major component in the development of an integrated pest management program for SHB.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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