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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING GENOMICS TO DEFINE AND CONTROL PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN CATTLE Title: Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum of cattle

Authors
item Rinaldi, Manuela -
item Dreesen, Leentje -
item Hoorens, Prisca -
item Li, Robert
item Claerebout, Edwin -
item Goddeeris, Bruno -
item Vercruysse, Jozef -
item Vandenbroeck, Wim -
item Geldhof, Peter -

Submitted to: Veterinary Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2011
Publication Date: May 11, 2011
Citation: Rinaldi, M., Dreesen, L., Hoorens, P., Li, R.W., Claerebout, E., Goddeeris, B., Vercruysse, J., Vandenbroeck, W., Geldhof, P. 2011. Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum of cattle. Veterinary Research. 42(1):61.

Interpretive Summary: Ostertagia ostertagi is arguably among the most important parasites causing a considerable economical loss to the American cattle industry. Parasitic nematode infection elicits drastic changes in gene expression in host cells. In this study, we examined the effects of an Ostertagia ostertagi infection on the abomasal mucus biosynthesis in cattle using immunohistochemistry. Our results provided insight into the roles that mucins play in protective immunity against nematode infection in the bovine gastrointestinal tract.

Technical Abstract: The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered to be the first line of defense to the external environment. Alteration in mucus components has been reported to occur during intestinal nematode infection in ruminants, but the role of mucus in the response to abomasal parasites remains largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to analyze the effects of an Ostertagia ostertagi infection on the abomasal mucus biosynthesis in cattle. Increased gene expression of MUC1, MUC6 and MUC20, was observed, while MUC5AC did not change during infection. Qualitative changes of mucins, related to sugar composition, were also observed. AB-PAS and HID-AB stainings highlighted a decrease in neutral and an increase in acidic mucins, throughout the infection. Several genes involved in mucin core structure synthesis, branching and oligomerization, such as GCNT3, GCNT4, A4GNT and protein disulphide isomerases (PDI) were found to be upregulated. Increase in mucin fucosylation was observed using the lectin UEA-I and through the evaluation of fucosyltransferases gene expression levels. Finally, transcription levels of both TFF1 and TFF3, which are co-expressed with mucins in the GI tract, were also found to be significantly upregulated in infected animals. Although the alterations in mucus biosynthesis started early during infection, the biggest effects were found when adult worms were present on the surface of the abomasal mucosa and are likely caused by the alterations in mucosal cell populations, characterized by hyperplasia of mucus secreting cells.

Last Modified: 10/19/2014
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