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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DOMESTIC, EXOTIC, AND EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS (DEED)

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: A natural M RNA reassortant arising from two species of plant-and-insect-infecting bunyaviruses and comparison of its sequences and biological properties to parental species

Authors
item Webster, Craig
item Reitz, Stuart
item Perry, Keith -
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: Virology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 9, 2011
Publication Date: May 10, 2011
Citation: Webster, C.G., Reitz, S.R., Perry, K.L., Adkins, S.T. 2011. A natural M RNA reassortant arising from two species of plant-and-insect-infecting bunyaviruses and comparison of its sequences and biological properties to parental species. Virology. 413:216-225.

Interpretive Summary: Virus isolates collected from Florida tomatoes were characterized and found to be the result of a reassortment between two distinct species of plant infecting viruses. The small (S) and large (L) segments belonged to Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), whereas the medium segment (M) belonged to Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV). This is the first time we have observed what appears to be a natural reassortment between two species of plant-infecting bunyaviruses has been found. The response of these isolates to resistant tomato and pepper lines was consistent with those of the two parent species (GRSV and TCSV) and the virus was also acquired and transmitted by the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis), a common thrips species in Florida. These results provide additional insight into the role of this newly described virus genotype on tomato production in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: Nucleic acid sequencing of viruses collected from Florida tomatoes contained a reassortment of two distinct species with the S and L segments belonging to Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), whereas the M segment belonged to tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV). Inoculations on resistance gene containing pepper and tomato cultivars showed they behaved the same as the parental species, and were also acquired and transmitted by the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). This is the first report where we observed what appears to be a reassortment occurring between two tospovirus species.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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