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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NEW AND IMPROVED CULTURAL PRACTICES FOR SUSTAINABLE SUGARCANE PRODUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Title: Smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) response to concrete grinding residue application

Authors
item Desutter, Thomas -
item Goosen-Alix, Patricia -
item Prutny, Lyle -
item White, Paul
item Casey, Frank -

Submitted to: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 13, 2011
Publication Date: May 3, 2011
Citation: Desutter, T.M., Goosen-Alix, P., Prutny, L., White Jr, P.M., Casey, F.X. 2011. Smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) response to concrete grinding residue application. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution. 222:195-204.

Interpretive Summary: Concrete grinding residue (CGR) is a slurry byproduct created by concrete pavement maintenance operations. The material is characteristically high in calcium. The application of CGR to roadside soils is not consistently regulated by state agencies across the United States. Much of this variability in regulation may be due to the lack of science-based information on the impacts of CGR to soils and plants. The objectives of this research were to determine the impact of CGR additions to soil on both smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) biomass and soil chemical parameters. The two CGR products are derived from concrete roadway grinding from in Minnesota (Interstate-54) and California (Interstate-10). In a greenhouse study, two soils (Wyndmere fine sandy loam and Fargo silty clay) were treated with two CGR at rates of about 83 and 260 Mg ha-1. Smooth brome was grown for 11 weeks and after which the shoots and roots were dried and weighed and both plants and soils were analyzed for chemical parameters. Generally calcium uptake was increased by the addition of CGR to soil. Trace metal concentrations in the biomass were variable but concentrations in the soil were within ranges for natural, non-contaminated areas. Soil pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were higher after addition of CGR. Few other parameters were found to have changed distinctly. Thus, application of similar CGR products to roadways should be considered a best management practice for applicable states.

Technical Abstract: Concrete grinding residue (CGR) is a slurry byproduct created by concrete pavement maintenance operations. The application of CGR to roadside soils is not consistently regulated by state agencies across the United States. Much of this variability in regulation may be due to the lack of science-based information on the impacts of CGR to soils and plants. The objectives of this research were to determine the impact of CGR additions to soil on both smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) biomass and soil chemical parameters. The two CGR products are derived from concrete roadway grinding from in Minnesota (Interstate-54) and California (Interstate-10). In a greenhouse study, two soils (Wyndmere fine sandy loam and Fargo silty clay) were treated with two CGR byproducts at 8% and 25% by weight, which is equal to an aerial application rate of about 83 and 260 Mg ha 1. Smooth brome was allowed to grow for approximately 11 weeks and after which the shoots and roots were quantified and both biomass and soils were analyzed for chemical parameters. Smooth brome biomass was significantly influenced (p < 0.05) by the main effects (Soil, CGR, and Rate) and by all two-way interactions, but not consistently positively or negatively. Uptake of Ca was significantly greater (p < 0.05) in CGR amended Wyndmere soil and across all main effects Ca uptake was significantly influenced by CGR, Rate, Soil x Rate, and CGR x Rate. Trace metal concentrations in the biomass were variable, but 68% of these metals had the same concentration or lower in the 25% CGR treatments when compared to the control treatments. Soil pH and electrical conductivity (EC) were significantly influenced by the main effects and two-way interactions of Soil x Rate and CGR x Rate, and soil pH was significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the CGR treated soils compared to the controls. Calcium, Na, Mg, Al, and S concentrations in soils were all influenced by additions of CGR. Trace metal concentrations in the soil were variable, with some being diluted or increased by CGR application. Nonetheless, trace metal levels were all within the range for uncontaminated soils. Application of CGR products clearly increased soil pH and EC. However, no other parameters were found to have changed distinctly. Thus, application of similar CGR products to roadways should be considered a best management practice for applicable states.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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