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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY, BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF NATURAL ENEMIES OF INSECT PESTS OF CROPS, URBAN AND NATURAL AREAS Title: Microsatellite variability in the entomopathogenic fungus Paeciolomyces fumosoroseus: genetic diversity and population structure

Authors
item Gauthier, N -
item Dalleau-Clouet, C -
item Fargues, J -
item Bon, Marie-Claude -

Submitted to: Mycologia
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2007
Publication Date: May 30, 2007
Citation: Gauthier, N., Dalleau-Clouet, C., Fargues, J., Bon, M. 2007. Microsatellite variability in the entomopathogenic fungus Paeciolomyces fumosoroseus: genetic diversity and population structure. Mycologia.

Interpretive Summary: A pathogen of various insects was found to have biotypes specifically associated with Bemesia tabaci, using microsatellite analysis of DNA. One lineage was distributed across the Americas. Another lineage was distributed across Asia and consisted of four distinct clusters. The study resulted in a new approach to these sorts of analyses, by sequencing microsatellite flanking regions and repeats.

Technical Abstract: The hyphomycete Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Pfr) is a geographically widespread fungus capable of infecting various insect hosts. The fungus has been used for the biological control of several important insect pests of agriculture. However knowledge of the fungus’ genetic diversity and population structure is required for its sustainable use as a biological control agent. We investigated length and sequence polymorphisms of nine microsatellite loci for 33 Pfr accessions sampled from various host species and geographical locations, and our results reveal complex mutational processes for these molecular markers. Only Pfr isolates from Bemisia tabaci were amplified successfully, indicating the existence of Pfr genotypes specifically associated with B. tabaci. Genetic relationships among the 25 Pfr isolates from B. tabaci were inferred from allelic variability data at eight microsatellite loci that were polymorphic and subsequently from sequence data from the flanking regions of three selected loci. Maximum parsimony and neighbor joining analyses partitioned Pfr genetic diversity in two major lineages. One lineage included genotypes from the B-biotype of B. tabaci distributed across the Americas and was strongly supported in both analyses. Another lineage was distributed across Asia and consisted of four distinct clusters. Allele size homoplasy was found at the three microsatellite loci. We obtained better discrimination and resolution of the relationships among isolates with sequence data, although not all isolates could be typed. Thus sequencing of microsatellite flanking regions and repeats is a promising approach for the identification of Pfr isolates that specifically infect certain B. tabaci biotypes and phylogeographic studies.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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