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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF CROP INSECT PESTS IN LOCAL AND AREAWIDE PROGRAMS

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit

Title: Female Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) response to the vibration component of male wing-fanning signals

Authors
item Mankin, Richard
item Egan, Mackenzie -

Submitted to: Fruit Flies of Economic Importance International Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2010
Publication Date: November 20, 2010
Citation: Mankin, R.W., Egan, M. 2010. Female Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) response to the vibration component of male wing-fanning signals. Fruit Flies of Economic Importance International Symposium. p. 36-41.

Technical Abstract: Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) is an important pest of fruit crops in Florida and islands in the Caribbean region. Courtship and mating behaviors have been analyzed in previous studies to develop control methods. During courtship, males group in leks on leaves of host trees, fan their wings, and release pheromone to attract females. The wing fanning vibrations are transferred though their legs to the leaves and nearby stems. We hypothesized that females detect these wing-fanning vibrations, and their behavioral responses may affect the likelihood of mating. Bioassays were conducted in which females were exposed to periods of male wing-fanning vibrations and periods of quiet. The females flew or moved about less often during vibration periods than during quiet periods. This suggests that wing-fanning vibrations may function partly to reduce the likelihood that a female will move away from a male who approaches her to mate.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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