Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGICALLY-BASED STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING INSECT PESTS OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Biology of the invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in the western United States

Authors
item Lee, Jana
item Negron, Jose -
item Mcelwey, Sally -
item Williams, Livy -
item Witcosky, Jeff -
item Popp, John -
item Seybold, Steve -

Submitted to: Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 10, 2011
Publication Date: July 1, 2011
Citation: Lee, J.C., Negron, J., Mcelwey, S., Williams, L., Witcosky, J., Popp, J., Seybold, S. 2011. Biology of the invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in the western United States. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 104(4):705-717.

Interpretive Summary: The banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi, is from Asia and was detected in the United States in 2003. Currently, S. schevyrewi is found in 28 states and four Canadian Provinces and infests the same elm hosts as the long-established invasive, and smaller European elm bark beetle, S. multistriatus. Information on the basic biology of S. schevyrewi in its native range is sparse, and laboratory and field studies were conducted in Colorado and Nevada on its host colonization behavior, electrophysiological response to semiochemicals, and flight behavior. When Siberian elm bolts were allowed to be colonized by wild populations in the field, S. schevyrewi did not differ in emergence density from 10 cm vs. 24 cm dia. bolts. In the laboratory, S. schevyrewi readily colonized American elm, but not Chinese elm, Siberian peashrub, Caragana arborescens Lam., a cherry, or Russian olive, . In Colorado/Nevada, S. schevyrewi started flying in April/March and stopped in October/September, whereas S. multistriatus started in May/April and stopeed in October/September. In Colorado, S. schevyrewi landed on elm bolts at the greatest rate between noon and 4 pm, and near large elm trees, they were captured more frequently on sticky traps at 1.8 and 3.7 m aboveground than higher in the crown. In Colorado or Nevada, S. schevyrewi had moderate responses to Multilure (a commercial lure for S. multistriatus), to 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MB) + multistriatin, and to MB + a plant extract that is included in a commercial formulation of Multilure. These responses were 3-10-fold greater than to the unbaited control. This work also suggests that no improvements to the lure of MB or Multilure are recommended at this time even though these lures are only moderately attractive.

Technical Abstract: The invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, native to Asia, was detected in the United States in 2003 and is now known to occur in 28 states and four Canadian Provinces. S. schevyrewi infests the same elm hosts as the long-established invasive, and smaller European elm bark beetle, S. multistriatus. Information on the basic biology of S. schevyrewi in its native range is sparse, and laboratory and field studies were conducted in Colorado and Nevada on its host colonization behavior, electrophysiological response to semiochemicals, and flight behavior. Comparisons of these attributes were made with co-occurring S. multistriatus. When Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila L., cut logs (bolts) were allowed to be colonized by wild populations in the field, S. schevyrewi did not differ in emergence density from 10 cm vs. 24 cm dia. bolts. In the laboratory, S. schevyrewi readily colonized American elm, U. americana L., but not Chinese elm, U. parvifolia Jacq., Siberian peashrub, Caragana arborescens Lam., a cherry, Prunus fontanesiana (Spach) C. K. Schneid., or Russian olive, Elaeagnus angustifolia L. In Colorado/Nevada, S. schevyrewi initiated flight in April/March and ceased in October/September, whereas S. multistriatus initiated flight in May/April and ceased in October/September. In Colorado, S. schevyrewi landed on elm bolts at the greatest rate between noon and 4 pm, and near large elm trees, they were captured more frequently on sticky traps at 1.8 and 3.7 m aboveground than higher in the crown. In Colorado or Nevada, S. schevyrewi had moderate responses to Multilure (a commercial lure for S. multistriatus), to 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MB) + multistriatin, and to MB + a plant extract that is included in a commercial formulation of Multilure. These responses were 3-10-fold greater than to the unbaited control. In contrast, S. multistriatus exhibited a 226-259-fold increase in captures to Multilure compared to the control. Both Scolytus species showed electroantennographic (EAG) responses to MB, racemic multistriatin.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page