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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGY OF WEED POPULATIONS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN Title: Techniques for Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. control suitable for use in fallow organic transition in the southeastern U.S. coastal plain

Authors
item Johnson, Wiley
item Davis, J.W. -

Submitted to: Crop Protection Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 9, 2012
Publication Date: May 16, 2012
Citation: Johnson, III, W.C., Davis, J.W. 2012. Techniques for Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. control suitable for use in fallow organic transition in the southeastern U.S. coastal plain. Crop Protection Journal. 39:63-65.

Interpretive Summary: Common bermudagrass is a troublesome perennial grass common in the southeastern U. S. and extremely difficult to control in organic crop production systems. Sites commonly use for transition to certified organic crop production are frequently infested with common bermudagrass. Research trials in a site heavily infested with common bermudagrass were conducted from 2008 to 2010 to evaluate systems of perennial weed control during fallow organic transition. Treatments evaluated were all possible combinations of two primary tillage implements (power spader, disk harrow), summer weed control (solarization, fallow tillage with a peanut digger, and non-treated control), and winter tillage (fallow tillage with a peanut digger and non-tilled control). Weed control parameters were measured the following spring, ten months after trial initiation. Common bermudagrass densities were reduced by combinations of summer solarization or summer tillage with a peanut digger, followed by winter tillage with a peanut digger. The peanut digger displaced common bermudagrass and exposed the vegetative material to desiccation. However, control was not sufficient enough to prevent re-infestation by survivors. Primary tillage with a power spader reduced perennial nutsedge tuber densities compared to the disk harrow. These results indicate that an integrated system of summer solarization or summer tillage with a peanut digger, followed by winter tillage with a peanut digger reduce densities of common bermudagrass. However, using systems of this type for only one season are not effective and the weed will repopulate.

Technical Abstract: Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. (common bermudagrass) is a troublesome perennial grass common in the southeastern U. S. and extremely difficult to control in organic crop production systems. Research trials in a site heavily infested with C. dactylon were conducted from 2008 to 2010 to evaluate systems of perennial weed control during fallow organic transition. Treatments evaluated were all possible combinations of two primary tillage implements (power spader, disk harrow), summer weed control (solarization, fallow tillage with a peanut digger, and non-treated control), and winter tillage (fallow tillage with a peanut digger and non-tilled control). Weed control parameters were measured the following spring, ten months after trial initiation. C. dactylon densities were reduced by combinations of summer solarization or summer tillage with a peanut digger, followed by winter tillage with a peanut digger. The peanut digger displaced C. dactylon and exposed the vegetative material to desiccation. However, control was not sufficient enough to prevent re-infestation by survivors. Primary tillage with a power spader reduced Cyperus spp. tuber densities compared to the disk harrow. These results indicate that an integrated system of summer solarization or summer tillage with a peanut digger, followed by winter tillage with a peanut digger reduce densities of C. dactylon. However, using systems of this type for only one season are not effective and the weed will repopulate.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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