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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARID RANGELANDS

Location: Range Management Research

Title: Vegetation maps at the passage of the Taylor Grazing Act (1934): A baseline to evaluate rangeland change after a regime shift

Authors
item Skaggs, Rhonda -
item Edwards, Zach -
item Bestelmeyer, Brandon
item Wright, John -
item Williamson, Jeb -
item Smith, Philip -

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 15, 2010
Publication Date: February 1, 2011
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57491
Citation: Skaggs, R., Edwards, Z., Bestelmeyer, B.T., Wright, J.B., Williamson, J., Smith, P. 2011. Vegetation maps at the passage of the Taylor Grazing Act (1934): A baseline to evaluate rangeland change after a regime shift. Rangelands. 33(1):13-19.

Interpretive Summary: We describe the production and use of a digital vegetation map based on paper maps of vegetation produced in the 1930s across areas in the western US administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The maps provide a critical baseline for evaluation of the effects of the Taylor Grazing Act on vegetation conditions in US rangelands.

Technical Abstract: Data from New Mexico range survey maps created shortly after the passage of the Taylor Grazing Act in 1934 have been preserved and are being used to document changes in vegetation. The range survey data were collected at the time of a critical shift in rangeland policy and practice in federal lands of the United States. This paper describes the historical context of the post-Taylor range surveying, documents the process of creating the 1930s vegetation cover data from the maps, and illustrates how the data are being used to understand patterns of ecosystem change.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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