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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING THE ALLERGENIC PROPERTIES OF PEANUTS

Location: Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research

Title: Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to atlantic white shrimp (litopenaeus setiferus).

Authors
item Shriver, S -
item Yang, W -
item Chung, Si-Yin
item Rababah, T.M. -
item Percival, S -

Submitted to: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 19, 2011
Publication Date: June 24, 2011
Citation: Shriver, S., Yang, W., Chung, S., Rababah, T., Percival, S. 2011. Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to atlantic white shrimp (litopenaeus setiferus). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 8:2569-2583.

Interpretive Summary: Shellfish allergies are more common than any other food allergy for adults in the United States, causing moderate to severe health consequences, including death. Because pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been reportedly effective in reducing peanut and soybean allergens, this study examined its efficacy in reducing shrimp allergens. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) homogenate was treated with PUV for 4 min. The treatment effect was compared to that of untreated (raw), boiling and boiled/then PUV. Treated samples were then analyzed for levels of allergens (whether they were reduced or not), and their affinity for specific antibodies from a pooled serum of individuals who were allergic to shrimps, using biochemical and immunochemical techniques. Results showed that there was a reduction in the level of shrimp allergens after PUV treatment, and that the affinity of specific antibodies for the allergens in samples treated with PUV was pronouncedly reduced; compared to raw, boiled, and boiled/PUV samples. In conclusion, PUV greatly reduced the level of shrimp allergens and the affinity of specific antibodies for the allergens and homogenate. The research suggests that PUV technology may provide a potential means for producing hypoallergenic shrimp products.

Technical Abstract: To date, the only effective method to prevent allergic reactions to shellfish is complete avoidance; however, if processing methods could be employed to minimize shellfish allergens before products reach consumers, illness could be substantially lessened. Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been reportedly effective in reducing the allergen reactivity in peanut samples. In this study, the efficacy of PUV on mitigating IgE-binding to the major heat-stable shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36 kDa), was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) homogenate (10 ml) was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source) for 240 s using a Xenon Steripulse XL-3000 unit. Tropomyosin was monitored among raw, boiled, PUV-treated, and PUV/boiled samples using SDS-PAGE. IgE-binding to tropomyosin was analyzed via immunoblot and ELISA using pooled human plasma. Reductions in tropomyosin after PUV treatment were noted, and IgE-binding to tropomyosin in samples treated with PUV was pronouncedly decreased, compared to raw and boiled samples in indirect ELISA and blot assays. In conclusion, PUV greatly reduced the level of tropomyosin and IgE binding of the allergen and homogenate. PUV technology may provide a potential means for producing hypoallergenic shrimp products.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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