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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS Title: Morphometric analysis of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) pertaining to different geographical regions of the world

Authors
item Kumar, V -
item Seal, D -
item McKenzie, Cindy
item Kakkar, G -

Submitted to: Thysanoptera International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2009
Publication Date: October 4, 2009
Citation: Kumar, V., Seal, D.R., McKenzie, C.L., Kakkar, G. 2009. Morphometric analysis of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) pertaining to different geographical regions of the world [abstract]. Thysanoptera International Conference Proceedings, August 31 - September 4, 2009, Gold Coast Australia.

Technical Abstract: Belonging to the devastating genus Scirtothrips, Scirthothrips dorsalis (Hood) is an emerging pest of various economically important host crops in south Florida. Since its advent in 2005, it is dispersing quickly all over the state. It is a threat to the fruit, ornamental and vegetable industries owing to its feeding damage and tremendous potential to spread at least six viral diseases to its host plants including three Tospoviruses. It has more than 140 reported hosts among 40 different families of plants. With its ability to spread all over the United States, it has been predicted to cause an annual damage of more than $3.0 billion. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of this exotic and potentially invasive taxon is essential to implementing effective plant quarantine and biological control initiatives. Both biotic and abiotic factors play an important role in regulating the biology of an organism. A major objective of our study is to determine how these factors influence the body size of chilli thrips. Samples of S. dorsalis were collected from five different geographical regions of the world, namely India, Israel, Japan, St. Vincent and the United States. Sizes of various body segments of S. dorsalis collected from aforementioned regions were measured and compared. Considering the effect of diet on morphometric characters, we found no significant difference in size of life stages of chilli thrips fed on different hosts. The study of determining the putative origin of Florida populations and establishing a relationship among these five populations of S. dorsalis using molecular techniques is under progress.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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