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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DIETARY CAROTENOIDS, RETINOIDS, AND BIOACTIVATES ON HEALTHY AGING Title: Site-specific concentrations of carotenoids in adipose tissue: relations with dietary and serum carotenoid concentrations in healthy adults

Authors
item Chung, Hae-Yun -
item Ferreirra, Ana-Lucia -
item Epstein, Susanna -
item Paiva, Sergio -
item Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen -
item Johnson, Elizabeth -

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 8, 2009
Publication Date: September 1, 2009
Citation: Chung, H., Ferreirra, A.A., Epstein, S., Paiva, S., Castaneda-Sceppa, C., Johnson, E.J. 2009. Site-specific concentrations of carotenoids in adipose tissue: relations with dietary and serum carotenoid concentrations in healthy adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 90:533-539.

Interpretive Summary: Dietary carotenoids are plant pigments that are related to decreased risk of certain diseases. Blood and fat tissue carotenoid concentrations are used as indicators of intake. This study examined relationships among concentrations of carotenoids in diet, blood and fat tissue. Twelve women and thirteen healthy men participated in this cross-sectional study. Dietary carotenoids were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Blood and fat tissue biopsies (abdomen, buttock, inner thigh) were obtained and measured for carotenoids. For the majority of carotenoids, the amount of diet in was not related to amount in blood or fat. For most carotenoids, the fat tissue from abdomen had significantly higher concentrations of carotenoids then that from the inner thigh. Abdominal fat tissue had significantly higher concentrations of lutein than that of buttocks. For all subjects and for most carotenoids, blood concentrations correlated with concentrations in the abdomen and buttocks. The inability to measure significant relationships between diet and blood or tissue carotenoids may be due to the dietary period of time each reflects. Blood carotenoid concentrations may be a useful indicator of body stores. Differences among fat tissue sites in carotenoid concentrations may have implications to interactions among carotenoid metabolism, body fat distribution and risk of disease.

Technical Abstract: Dietary carotenoids are related to decreased risk of certain diseases. Serum and adipose tissue carotenoid concentrations are used as biomarkers of intake. This study examined relationships among concentrations of carotenoids in diet, serum and adipose tissue. Twelve women and thirteen healthy men participated in this cross-sectional study. Dietary carotenoids were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Serum and adipose tissue biopsies (abdomen, buttock, inner thigh) were obtained and measured for carotenoids by HPLC. For most carotenoids, the adipose tissue from abdomen had significantly higher concentrations of carotenoids than that from thigh. Concentrations of 13-cis 3-carotene, a-carotene, trans f3-carotene and 5-cis lycopene were significantly higher in buttocks than in the inner thigh. Abdominal adipose tissue had significantly higher concentrations of lutein and a-carotene than that of buttocks. Dietary intake was significantly correlated with serum concentrations of a-carotene, 13- carotene and P-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoid intake was significantly correlated with adipose tissue concentrations of a-carotene,) 3- carotene, p-cryptoxanthin and cis-lycopene. In general, among adipose tissues, abdomen showed strongest correlation with dietary intake. Adipose tissue carotenoid concentrations were more closely correlated with respective serum levels than with dietary intakes. Differences among adipose tissue sites in carotenoid concentrations may have implications to interactions among carotenoid metabolism, body fat distribution and risk of disease.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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