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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION, CONVERSION, AND IMPROVEMENT OF COMMON BEAN GERMPLASM Title: Genotypic differences in water use efficiency of common bean under drought stress

Authors
item Ramirez-Builes, V -
item Porch, Timothy
item Harmsen, Eric -

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 17, 2011
Publication Date: May 26, 2011
Citation: Ramirez-Builes, V.H., Porch Clay, T.G., Harmsen, E.W. 2011. Evaluation of the efficiency of water use in common bean under drought and non-stress conditions in the greenhouse and field. Agronomy Journal. 103:1206-1215.

Interpretive Summary: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is extensively grown in production zones where water is limiting. In order to characterize the efficiency of crop water use in a particular environment, an index termed Water use efficiency (WUE), has been developed to quantify a cultivars reaction to drought stress. WUE is the ratio of yield produced by the cultivar per unit of water used by the cultivar. The objectives of this study were to determine WUE for six common bean cultivars in the greenhouse and for two cultivars in the field, and to determine the efficiency of transpiration for two common bean genotypes. Three greenhouse trials and two field trials were conducted during three years in Puerto Rico. Three water levels in the greenhouse and two in the field were applied. Differences among genotypes for WUE were found in the greenhouse experiments. Transpiration efficiency varied with water level and was consistent with previously reported coefficients for common bean. The results from this study indicate that under greenhouse water-limited conditions, several genotypes showed superior water use efficiency and thus could be used for improvement of this trait in breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is extensively grown in production zones where water is limiting. Water use efficiency (WUE), the ratio of biomass or yield produced per unit of water evapotranspired, is used to characterize the efficiency of crop water use in a particular environment. The specific efficiency of plant water use, considering only the water transpired, is described by transpiration efficiency (TE). The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine WUE for six common bean genotypes in the greenhouse and for two genotypes in the field, and 2) determine TE for two common bean genotypes using estimated evapotranspiration rates in the field. Three greenhouse trials and two field trials were conducted during three years in Puerto Rico. Three water levels in the greenhouse and two in the field were applied. Evapotranspiration was estimated by the general Penman-Monteith (PM) model with variable aerodynamic and surface resistance, and with drainage type lysimeters in the field. Differences among genotypes for WUE were found in the greenhouse experiments. In the evaluation of transpiration efficiency, the TE coefficient, represented by k, varied with water level and was consistent with previously reported coefficients for common bean. The results from this study indicate that under greenhouse water-limited conditions, several genotypes showed superior water use efficiency and thus could be used for improvement of this trait in breeding programs.

Last Modified: 12/27/2014
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