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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY-BASED PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR WESTERN COTTON Title: Impact of Bt Transgenic Cotton on Integrated Pest Management

Author
item Naranjo, Steven

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2010
Publication Date: June 8, 2011
Citation: Naranjo,S.E. 2011. Impact of Bt transgenic cotton on integrated pest management. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 59:5842-5851.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton accounts for about 40% of the world’s natural fiber production and is commercially cultivated in 78 countries from temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. The crop has historically been one of the largest users of insecticides in the world. Cotton that produces the insecticidal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is now produced on over 15 million hectares in 11 countries and is a highly effective form of host plant resistance that controls major caterpillar pests. It is estimated that the adoption of Bt cotton has led to a reduction of over 140 million kg of insecticide active ingredient between 1996 and 2008, with most of the benefits being enjoyed by developing nations. Bt cotton has become a key element in overall IPM programs for cotton where it controls key pests and also facilitates biological pest control of other insects that are not susceptible to the Bt toxins. Ironically, reductions in insecticide use in some regions have elevated the importance of several pest groups, but most of these emerging problems can be effectively solved through an IPM approach.

Technical Abstract: Cotton that produces the insecticidal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is now produced on over 15 million hectares in 11 countries and has contributed to a reduction in over 140 million kg of insecticide active ingredient between 1996 and 2008. As a highly selective form of host plant resistance, Bt cotton effectively controls a number of key lepidopteran pests and has become a cornerstone in overall integrated pest management (IPM). Bt cotton has led to large reductions in the abundance of targeted pests and benefited non-Bt cotton adopters and even producers of other crops affected by polyphagous target pests. Reductions in insecticide use have enhanced biological control, which has contributed to significant suppression of other key and sporadic pests in cotton. However, reductions in insecticide use in some regions have elevated the importance of several pest groups, but most of these emerging problems can be effectively solved through an IPM approach.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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