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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POTATO GENETICS, CYTOGENETICS, DISEASE RESISTANCE, AND PRE-BREEDING UTILIZING WILD AND CULTIVATED SPECIES

Location: Vegetable Crops Research Unit

Title: Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Wild Potato Species

Authors
item Jansky, Shelley
item Fajardo, Diego

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 2, 2010
Publication Date: August 17, 2010
Citation: Jansky, S.H., Fajardo, D.A. 2010. Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Wild Potato Species [abstract]. 4th Annual Plant Breeding Meeting.

Technical Abstract: Approximately 20% of potato tuber fresh weight is starch, which is composed of amylose (straight chains of glucose) and amylopectin (branched chains). Potato starch is low in amylose (~25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. Amylose content has been determined in tuber samples from 107 accessions representing 39 Solanum species. Overall, the average amylose content in tuber starch was 30.5%. The top five species for mean amylose percentage were S. commersonii, S. acuale, S. stenotomum, S. raphanifolium and S. circaefolium (34.9-37.7%), while the lowest three species were S. lignicaule, S. berthaultii and S. morelliforme with amylose percentages ranging from 20.2% to 24.2%. Accessions from S. bukasovii averaged 33.5%, but two accessions appear to be exceptionally high in tuber amylose content, ranging from 38% to 41%. A fine screen of potato tubers from 79 accessions of S. microdontum showed an average of 31.2%, ranging from 28.4% to 35.1% amylose content. A preliminary evaluation of two S. commersonii accessions with high and low tuber amylose revealed that amylose content varies among plants within an accession.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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