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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF HEALTH-RELATED MICROORGANISMS AND ODOR

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Narrow grass hedge control of nutrient loads following variable manure application

Authors
item Gilley, John
item Durso, Lisa
item Eigenberg, Roger
item Marx, David -
item Woodbury, Bryan

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2011
Publication Date: June 24, 2011
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/49833
Citation: Gilley, J.E., Durso, L.M., Eigenberg, R.A., Marx, D.B., Woodbury, B.L. 2011. Narrow grass hedge control of nutrient loads following variable manure application. Transactions of the ASABE. 54(3):847-855.

Interpretive Summary: The placement of stiff-stemmed grass hedges on the contour along a hill slope has been shown to reduce nutrient transport in runoff. This study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient transport soon after manure application. Beef cattle manure was applied to a silty clay loam soil located in southeast Nebraska at rates required to meet 0, 1, 2 or 4-year corn nitrogen requirements. Three 30-minute simulated rainfall events, separated by 24-hour intervals, were then applied. Runoff water quality characteristics were measured from 0.75-m wide x 4.0-m long plots. Manure application rate significantly affected the transport of nutrients in runoff on the treatments without a grass hedge. However, nutrient transport was not significantly affected by manure application rate on the hedge treatments. The grass hedge reduced runoff transport of nutrients on the plots where manure was applied to values similar to those measured on the zero manure treatment. The experimental results indicate that stiff-stemmed grass hedges can significantly reduce the transport of nutrients in runoff occurring soon after manure application.

Technical Abstract: Nutrient transport in runoff has been shown to be reduced by the placement of stiff-stemmed grass hedges on the contour along a hill slope. This study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient transport soon after manure application. Beef cattle manure was applied to an Aksarben silty clay loam soil located in southeast Nebraska at rates required to meet 0, 1, 2 or 4-year corn N requirements. Three 30-minute simulated rainfall events, separated by 24-hour intervals, were then applied. Runoff water quality characteristics were measured from 0.75-m wide x 4.0-m long plots. Manure application rate significantly affected the transport of DP and TP in runoff on the treatments without a grass hedge. However, DP and TP transport were not significantly affected by manure application rate on the hedge treatments. The grass hedge reduced runoff transport of DP and TP on the plots where manure was applied to values similar to those measured on the zero manure treatment. The transport of NO3-N, NH4-N, and TN in runoff was significantly less on the hedge than the no-hedge treatments. No significant differences in EC values were found among manure application rates for the hedge condition. Each of the runoff water quality parameters were significantly affected by runoff rate. The experimental results indicate that stiff-stemmed grass hedges can significantly reduce the transport of nutrients in runoff occurring soon after manure application.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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