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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND EVALUATION OF CROP GENETIC RESOURCES AND ASSOCIATED INFORMATION

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Status of the U.S. Sweet Sorghum Collection for Biofuel Research

Author
item Pederson, Gary

Submitted to: International Symposium on Forage, Turfgrass and Biofuel Germplasm Research
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2010
Publication Date: October 8, 2010
Citation: Pederson, G.A. 2010. Status of the U.S. Sweet Sorghum Collection for Biofuel Research. International Symposium on Forage, Turfgrass and Biofuel Germplasm Research. Oct. 2010.

Interpretive Summary: Sweet Sorghum is a type of sorghum with juicy stems that contain a high amount of sugar. This crop grows in many different environments and soil types, so it would be very useful to grow for biofuel. The U.S. sweet sorghum collection contains 2,163 accessions obtained from over 62 countries. Many of these accessions were used by the Sugar Crops Field Station, Meridian, Mississippi, for sweet sorghum cultivar development prior to its closure in 1983. These accessions vary in sugar concentration and other traits. Plant breeders and other scientists have utilized the U.S. sweet sorghum collection much more in the last few years for their sweet sorghum biofuel research.

Technical Abstract: Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor subsp. bicolor (L.) Monench] is a widely adapted crop suitable for biofuel use due to high levels of sucrose accumulation in stems. The U.S. sweet sorghum collection contains 2,163 accessions obtained from over 62 countries. Many of these accessions were obtained by the Sugar Crops Field Station, Meridian, Mississippi, for sweet sorghum cultivar development prior to its closure in 1983. These accessions vary in brix value, sucrose concentration, and other traits. Utilization of the U.S. sweet sorghum collection has greatly increased in the last few years due to sweet sorghum biofuel research.

Last Modified: 7/27/2014
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