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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Impact of an intervention to improve middle school student breakfast participation rates

Authors
item Dave, Jayna -
item Watson, Kathleen -
item Cullen, Karen -

Submitted to: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2010
Publication Date: June 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://www.isbnpa.org/media/pdfs/2010%20ISBNPA%20Abstract%20Book%20PDF.pdf
Citation: Dave, J., Watson, K.B., Cullen, K.W. 2010. Impact of an intervention to improve middle school student breakfast participation rates [abstract]. International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abstract Book, June 9-12, 2010, Minneapolis, MN. p. 199-200.

Technical Abstract: Breakfast consumption is related to healthy weight. The goal of this study was to improve school breakfast (SB) participation among low-income middle school students. The study schools were primarily Hispanic, and >75% of the students were eligible for free/reduced price meals. The intervention included promotional flyers for teachers, parents, and students in the 3 intervention schools in early January, 2008. In 2 intervention schools, all children could receive a free breakfast and the teachers and principals offered encouragement to eat SB. In school 3, reduced price students could receive a free SB. Participation rates by free, reduced, and full pay meal status were obtained from the district Food Service Office for the 3 intervention and 2 matched control schools. Participation rates of the intervention and control schools were compared for Spring, 2008 and for the previous 3 semesters. Two-factor ANOVA was used to detect significant differences in mean percentages of SB consumers by group and semester. Significant interactions were investigated by computing differences in semesters by each group separately. Significant main effects for group (p<0.001), semester (p<0.001), and for their interaction (p<0.001) were found. Spring, 2008 consumption rates were significantly higher for intervention schools (58.8%), compared with control schools (34.5%). The intervention had a positive impact on SB participation. Interventions to promote SB participation are most effective when SB is free and staff offer positive encouragement. Future studies should assess whether SB participation influences school indicators like nurse and discipline visits by students.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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