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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS Title: Biological control of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida by the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata in urban plantings of orange jasmine

Authors
item Hall, David
item Walter, Abigail
item Duan, Ping

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2010
Publication Date: October 17, 2010
Citation: Hall, D.G., Walter, A.J., Duan, Y. 2010. Biological control of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Florida by the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata in urban plantings of orange jasmine [abstract]. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, December 11-16, 2010 in San Diego, California.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid is an important invasive citrus pest in the United States because it vectors a bacterium responsible for a devastating disease of citrus known as huanglongbing. A parasitoid of the psyllid, Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), was imported from Southeast Asia and released in Florida citrus shortly after the discovery of the psyllid in 1998. Orange jasmine (Murraya paniculata) is a favored alternate host plant of the psyllid and is widely grown as an ornamental plant in urban areas in Florida. Biological control of the psyllid by T. radiata had been evaluated in commercial citrus in Florida but not in urban plantings of jasmine. Psyllid management in urban areas could be an important component of area-wide psyllid suppression. Results will be presented of a survey for Asian citrus psyllid and T. radiata in urban plantings of jasmine in east central Florida.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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