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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE VINEYARD PRODUCTION SYSTEMS Title: Influence of atmospheric and climatic change on plant-pathogen interactions

Authors
item Eastburn, Darin -
item McElrone, Andrew
item Bilgin, Damla -

Submitted to: Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2010
Publication Date: February 1, 2011
Repository URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-3059.2010.02402.x/abstract
Citation: Eastburn, D.M., Mcelrone, A.J., Bilgin, D.B. 2011. Influence of atmospheric and climatic change on plant-pathogen interactions. Plant Pathology. 60(1):54-69.

Interpretive Summary: Atmospheric change studies conducted in Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) systems and open topped chambers have increased our understanding of how factors, such as rising CO2 and O3 levels, impact the development of plant disease epidemics. Using these systems, plant scientists have been able to study host/pathogen systems under real-world conditions where variations in multiple environmental parameters impact disease outcomes. Results from these studies are useful for evaluating earlier predictions on plant responses to climate change parameters and the resulting impacts on plant disease epidemics. Some of these predictions have been verified, while others have yet to be tested. Significant interactions among climate change parameters are highlighting the importance of conducting studies under real-world conditions. The development of molecular and gene expression tools is also allowing the fine scale mechanisms responsible for the observed reactions to be determined. Linking genes to physiological functions, abiotic stress tolerance, and pathogen response will increase our understanding of plant-pathogen co-evolution.

Technical Abstract: Atmospheric change studies conducted in Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) systems and open topped chambers have increased our understanding of how factors, such as rising CO2 and O3 levels, impact the development of plant disease epidemics. Using these systems, plant scientists have been able to study host/pathogen systems under real-world conditions where variations in multiple environmental parameters impact disease outcomes. Results from these studies are useful for evaluating earlier predictions on plant responses to climate change parameters and the resulting impacts on plant disease epidemics. Some of these predictions have been verified, while others have yet to be tested. Significant interactions among climate change parameters are highlighting the importance of conducting studies under real-world conditions. The development of molecular and gene expression tools is also allowing the fine scale mechanisms responsible for the observed reactions to be determined. Linking genes to physiological functions, abiotic stress tolerance, and pathogen response will increase our understanding of plant-pathogen co-evolution.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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