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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES RELATED TO INSECTS FOR ESTABLISHED AND INVASIVE PEST SPECIES

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Quality of mass-reared codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) after long distance transportation 1. Logistics of shipping procedures and quality parameters as measured in the laboratory.

Authors
item Blomefield, T. -
item Carpenter, James
item Vreysen, M.J.B. -

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2011
Publication Date: June 1, 2011
Citation: Blomefield, T., Carpenter, J.E., Vreysen, M. 2011. Quality of mass-reared codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) after long distance transportation: 1. Logistics of shipping procedures and quality parameters as measured in the laboratory. Journal of Economic Entomology. 104(3):814-822.

Interpretive Summary: The sterile insect technique is a proven effective control tactic against lepidopteran pests when applied in an area-wide integrated pest management programme. The construction of insect mass-rearing facilities requires considerable investment and moth control strategies that include the use of sterile insects could be made more cost effective through the importation of sterile moths produced in other production centres. For codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), this is an attractive option because mating studies have confirmed the absence of mating barriers between codling moth populations from geographically different areas. To assess the feasibility of long distance transportation of codling moths, pupae and adult moths were transported in 2004 from Canada to South Africa in four shipments using normal commercial transport routes. The total transport time remained below 67 h in three of the consignments, but was 89 h in the fourth. Temperature in the shipping boxes was fairly constant and remained between -0.61 and 0.16 ºC for 76.8 to 85.7% of the time. The results from this study indicate that transporting codling moths as adults and pupae from Canada to South Africa had little effect on their longevity and their ability to mate and to fly in the laboratory. These results provide support to the suggestion that the SIT for codling moth in pome fruit production areas might be evaluated and implemented by the importation of irradiated moths from rearing facilities in a different hemisphere or country.

Technical Abstract: The sterile insect technique is a proven effective control tactic against lepidopteran pests when applied in an area-wide integrated pest management programme. The construction of insect mass-rearing facilities requires considerable investment and moth control strategies that include the use of sterile insects could be made more cost effective through the importation of sterile moths produced in other production centres. For codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), this is an attractive option because mating studies have confirmed the absence of mating barriers between codling moth populations from geographically different areas. To assess the feasibility of long distance transportation of codling moths, pupae and adult moths were transported in 2004 from Canada to South Africa in four shipments using normal commercial transport routes. The total transport time remained below 67 h in three of the consignments, but was 89 h in the fourth. Temperature in the shipping boxes was fairly constant and remained between -0.61 and 0.16 ºC for 76.8 to 85.7% of the time. A significant three-way interaction was revealed between moth gender, irradiation treatment (150 Gy), and consignment as sources of variation for codling moth longevity as assessed in the laboratory. After the shipment, mean longevity of irradiated moths (9.2 d) was slightly, but significantly longer than the mean longevity of non-irradiated moths (8.7 d). Adult emergence was not significantly affected by location of irradiation, gender or consignment but the interactions were significant between day of emergence and location and consignment. Incidence of mating in laboratory cages was significantly affected by lapsed time and radiation treatment. The mean percentage mating in laboratory cages with irradiated moths was significantly lower (49%) than in the cages with non-irradiated moths (60%). The data presented indicate that transporting codling moths as adults and pupae from Canada to South Africa had little effect on their quality as assessed in the laboratory. These results provide support to the suggestion that the SIT for codling moth in pome fruit production areas might be evaluated and implemented by the importation of irradiated moths from rearing facilities in a different hemisphere or country.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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