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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF CITRUS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Citrus production systems to survive greening: economic thresholds.

Authors
item Roka, F. -
item Muraro, R. -
item Morris, R. -
item Spyke, Pete -
item Morgan, K. -
item Schumann, A. -
item Castle, W. -
item Stover, Ed

Submitted to: Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2009
Publication Date: January 1, 2010
Citation: Roka, F., Muraro, R., Morris, R.A., Spyke, P., Morgan, K., Schumann, A., Castle, W., Stover, E.W. 2010. Citrus production systems to survive greening: economic thresholds. Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society. 122:122-126

Interpretive Summary: Planting more trees per acre and improving control over irrigation are proposed strategies to increase early citrus production and sustain production at higher levels through perhaps the first 15 years of grove life. Higher tree densities, automated irrigation, and intensive nutrient management will increase costs per acre. Estimated cost increases are based on the APS/OHS specifications outlined in a companion paper, Citrus Production Systems to Survive Greening – Horticultural Practices. Economic techniques are used to evaluate the costs and benefits of AP/OH systems. Per acre yields must increase sufficiently to cover greater planting and per acre management costs. Sufficiently increasing yields within the first 5 to 7 years of a new grove could make it more likely that these new production systems will provide profits over a wider range of fruit prices.

Technical Abstract: Advanced Production Systems (APS) and Open Hydroponic Systems (OHS) are proposed strategies for citrus production that could increase early production and sustain production at higher levels through perhaps the first 15 years of grove life. Higher tree densities, automated irrigation, and intensive nutrient management will increase per acre establishment and annual cultural care costs. Estimated cost increases are based on the APS/OHS specifications outlined in a companion paper, Citrus Production Systems to Survive Greening – Horticultural Practices. This paper utilizes net present value (NPV) as a framework to evaluate the costs and benefits of AP/OH systems. Per acre yields must increase sufficiently to cover establishment costs. Sufficiently increasing yields within the first 5 to 7 years of a new grove could make it more likely that an AP/OH system will return positive profits over a wider range of fruit prices.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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