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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MAINTAINING SOIL RESOURCES FOR EFFECTIVE CONSERVATION AND HERBICIDE MANAGEMENT IN MID-SOUTH CROP PRODUCTION

Location: Crop Production Systems Research Unit

Title: Aminopyralid soil residues affect rotational vegetable crops in Florida

Authors
item Fast, Brandon -
item Ferrell, Jason -
item Macdonald, Gregory -
item Sellers, Brent -
item Macrae, Andrew -
item Krutz, Larry
item Kline, William -

Submitted to: Journal of Pesticide Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 21, 2010
Publication Date: March 16, 2011
Citation: Fast, B.J., Ferrell, J.A., Macdonald, G.E., Sellers, B.A., Macrae, A.W., Krutz, L.J., Kline, W.N. 2011. Aminopyralid soil residues affect rotational vegetable crops in Florida. Journal of Pesticide Science. 67:825-830.

Interpretive Summary: Aminopyralid is a residual herbicide used in pasture that can cause a yield loss in sensitive vegetable crops if enough residual material is present at the time the crop is established. The effect of aminopyralid residues on the marketable fruit of bell pepper, eggplant, tomato, muskmelon and watermelon was determined under field conditions. An aminopyralid concentration of 1ppb caused a reduction in marketable fruit of 91 for bell pepper, 86 eggplant, 98 for tomato, 27% for muskmelon, and 40 % for watermelon. Because these five crops were affected by aminopyralid at soil concentrations that cannot be reliably detected analytically (less than 1 ppb), it was concluded that a field bioassay must be used to determine if carryover injury will occur when these crops are planted on a site where aminopyralid has been previously applied.

Technical Abstract: Field experiments were conducted to determine the sensitivity of bell pepper, eggplant, tomato, muskmelon, and watermelon to aminopyralid soil residues. Aminopyralid was applied at six rates ranging from 0.0014 kg ae ha 1 to 0.0448 kg ae ha 1, and vegetable crops were planted in the treated areas. Crop injury, plant height reduction, and bloom number reduction were determined 6 WAP, and marketable fruit was harvested at maturity. At an aminopyralid soil concentration of 1 ppb crop injury ratings were 77 (bell pepper), 84 (eggplant), 85 (tomato), 14 (muskmelon), and 12% (watermelon), and fruit yield losses (relative to the untreated control) at 1ppb aminopyralid were 91, 86, 98, 27, and 40% in those respective crops. Because these five crops were affected by aminopyralid at soil concentrations that cannot be reliably detected analytically (less than 1 ppb), it was concluded that a field bioassay must be used to determine if carryover injury will occur when these crops are planted on a site where aminopyralid has been previously applied.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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