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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Title: Inheritance of soybean aphid resistance from soybean PI 71506

Authors
item Vannurden, Andrew -
item Scott, Roy
item Hesler, Louis
item Tilmon, Kelley -
item Glover, Karl -
item Carter, Catherine -

Submitted to: Journal of Crop Improvement
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 27, 2010
Publication Date: November 6, 2010
Citation: Van Nurden, A., Scott, R.A., Hesler, L.S., Tilmon, K., Glover, K., Carter, C. 2010. Inheritance of soybean aphid resistance from soybean PI 71506. Journal of Crop Improvement. 24(4):400-416. DOI: 10.1080/15427528.2010.511104.

Interpretive Summary: Soybean aphids continually establish populations of economic importance in soybean production areas. Insecticide application costs and yield losses prompt the development of resistant varieties. The soybean germplasm line named PI 71506 has been shown to be a non-preferred line and may also possess additional resistance to soybean aphid. Our objectives were to further characterize the resistance in PI 71506, determine its mode of inheritance, and compare resistance from PI 71506 with resistance of another know resistant line, Dowling. We crossed two susceptible adapted cultivars, SD1111RR and SD01-3219R, with PI 71506 to create populations for resistance screening. Individual plants were screened in greenhouse no-choice tests using small sticky cages, and pooled data in tests indicated resistance due to a single dominant gene in both populations. Segregation of aphid resistance in test lines in aphid field-cage trials also fit a single gene model, as did segregation of aphid resistance in other populations. However, further unknown genetic effects may also contribute to aphid resistance from PI 71506. Comparisons with Rag 1 resistance from Dowling indicated that the PI 71506 resistance was weaker than that of Dowling, but non-preference from PI 71506 was effective against an Ohio strain of soybean aphid biotype that had overcome resistance in Dowling.

Technical Abstract: Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) continually establish populations of economic importance in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production areas. Insecticide application costs and yield losses prompt the development of resistant varieties. The soybean germplasm accession PI 71506 has been shown to have antixenotic host plant resistance and may also possess some level of antibiosis. Our objectives were to further characterize the resistance exhibited by PI 71506, to determine its mode of inheritance, and to compare the resistance from PI 71506 with resistance of the Rag1 gene from Dowling. We crossed two susceptible adapted cultivars, SD1111RR and SD01-3219R, with PI 71506 to create F2 populations and subsequent F2:3 and F2:5 populations for resistance screening. Individual F2 plants were screened in greenhouse no-choice tests using small sticky cages, and pooled F2 data in chi square tests indicated resistance due to a single dominant gene segregation in both populations. Segregation of aphid resistance in F2:3 populations in aphid field cage trials also fit a single gene model, as did segregation of aphid resistance in the F2:5 generation. However, other unknown genetic effects may also contribute to aphid resistance from PI 71506. Phenotypic comparisons with Rag 1 resistance from Dowling indicated that the PI 71506 resistance was weaker than Rag1, but antixenosis resistance from PI 71506 was effective against an Ohio aphid biotype that has overcome Rag1 resistance.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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