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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVE NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT AND EFFICIENCY IN CATTLE Title: Polymorphisms in POMC are not associated with dry matter intake and average daily gain phenotypes in beef cattle

Authors
item Lindholm-Perry, Amanda
item Kuehn, Larry
item Snelling, Warren
item Smith, Timothy
item Ferrell, Calvin -
item Jenkins, Thomas -
item Freetly, Harvey

Submitted to: Animal Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2010
Publication Date: December 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/47115
Citation: Lindholm-Perry, A.K., Kuehn, L.A., Snelling, W.M., Smith, T.P.L., Ferrell, C.L., Jenkins, T.G., Freetly, H.C. 2010. Polymorphisms in POMC are not associated with dry matter intake and average daily gain phenotypes in beef cattle. Animal Genetics. 41(6):669-670.

Interpretive Summary: The largest expense incurred by beef cattle producers is the cost of feed. The ability to genetically select for more efficient animals that require less feed while still achieving acceptable levels of production will result in a substantial cost savings. A region located on chromosome 11 was identified as significant for the production traits of average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI). Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was identified as a candidate gene located within this region because of its role in appetite and feeding behavior. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in and near the POMC gene were evaluated for correlation with ADG and ADFI. None of these genetic markers were significant for ADG or ADFI. The SNP tested in these studies, located both in and around the POMC gene, are not likely to be responsible for the variation in feed intake and gain in beef cattle.

Technical Abstract: The cost of feed for beef cattle is the largest expense incurred by cattle producers. The ability to genetically select for more efficient animals that require less feed while still achieving acceptable levels of production will result in a substantial cost savings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate proopiomelanocortin (POMC) as a positional candidate gene involved in feed intake and BW gain, and to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers located in or near this gene with predictive merit for phenotypic differences among cattle. A total of 20 SNP were genotyped in crossbred steers (n=1195) with average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake phenotypes. Two of the SNP were nominally significant for ADG (P<0.05); however, these SNP failed to remain significant after correction for multiple testing. The SNP tested in these studies, located both in and around the POMC gene, are not likely to be responsible for the phenotypic variation in feed intake and gain in beef cattle.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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