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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED APPROACHES FOR IMPROVING EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF LOW-SALINITY MARINE AQUACULTURE PRODUCTION

Location: Harry K. Dupree Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Center

Title: Fish meal replacement with solvent extracted soybean meal or soy protein isolate in a practical diet formulation for Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus, L.) reared in low salinity

Authors
item Riche, Marty
item Williams, Tehera -

Submitted to: Aquaculture Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 18, 2010
Publication Date: July 5, 2011
Citation: Riche, M.A., Williams, T. 2011. Fish meal replacement with solvent extracted soybean meal or soy protein isolate in a practical diet formulation for Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus, L.) reared in low salinity. Aquaculture Nutrition. 17:368-379.

Interpretive Summary: High quality fish meal is the best source of protein for marine fish such as Florida pompano; however, replacement of fish meal with alternative protein sources will increase sustainability and profitability of the aquaculture industry. Soybean meal and soy protein isolate were fed to Florida pompano at increasing rates of 0 to 100% replacement of fish proteins in the feed. Based on survival, growth, and efficiency, Florida pompano effectively utilize feeds with fish protein replaced by up to 35% with soybean meal and up to 20% with soy protein isolate. An additional experiment suggested poor palatability made the fish reject feed with greater than 20% substitution with soy protein isolate. This information will allow fish feed manufacturers to substitute these feed ingredients for fish meal, resulting in less expensive and more environmentally responsible diets.

Technical Abstract: Two eight-week growth trials were conducted with juvenile Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus, fed 0 to 100% replacement of FM protein with soybean meal (SBM) or soy protein isolate (SPI). Practical-type diets were formulated with at least 360 g kg1 digestible protein and 24 mg kJ-1 digestible protein/digestible energy. Weight gain and efficiency were not different between 0 and 80% FM protein replacement with SBM. Regression of weight gain and protein productive value suggested a conservative level of SBM substitution was 35% FM protein. It appeared lysine could be limiting beyond 40% FM replacement. No significant differences were detected in fish fed 0 and 20% FM protein replacement with SPI. A decrease in weight gain and efficiency parameters occurred at 40% protein replacement, and fish fed a replacement of 60% or greater with SPI exhibited signs of starvation. A third trial indicated intake and growth were significantly reduced (P<0.0001) in fish fed 60% relative to 0% FM protein replacement with SPI. Poor palatability of diets containing 40% or more FM protein replacement with SPI appeared to be the causative factor for poor performance.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014