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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT FOR IMPROVED INSECT AND DISEASE RESISTANCE

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: 2009 Sunflower Insect Pest Problems and Insecticide Update

Authors
item Knodel, Janet -
item Charlet, Laurence
item Beauzay, Patrick -
item GROSS, THERESA
item Chirumamilla, Anitha -

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 26, 2010
Publication Date: February 28, 2010
Repository URL: http://sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_InsecticideUpdate_10.pdf
Citation: Knodel, J.J., Charlet, L.D., Beauzay, P.B., Gross, T.A., Chirumamilla, A. 2010. 2009 Sunflower Insect Pest Problems and Insecticide Update. 32nd Sunflower Research Workshop, January 13-14, 2010, Fargo, ND. Available: http://sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Knodel_InsecticideUpdate_10.pdf

Interpretive Summary: Sunflowers are native to North America and several insect pests cause economic losses to sunflower production in the Great Plains. Head-infesting insects include the red sunflower seed weevil, banded sunflower moth, sunflower moth, and sunflower midge. New emerging pests include the sunflower seed maggot and Lygus bug. A Sunflower Insect Trapping Network was coordinated by North Dakota State University (NDSU), USDA-ARS and the National Sunflower Association (NSA) for banded sunflower moth and sunflower moth using pheromone traps. Traps placed near sunflower fields were monitored weekly for moths. The trapping network provides an early pest warning system for sunflower moth, which migrates annually into the northern sunflower production areas and also provides information on seasonal flight activity and pest alerts for banded sunflower moth. 39 cooperators from eight states (CO, KS, OK, ND, MN, NE, SD, and TX) and one Canadian Province (Manitoba) participated. Results from the 2009 trapping network were mapped and posted on the NSA website during the field season and then archived at the NDSU Extension Entomology IPM website. The NSA organizes an annual sunflower field survey to assess yield, plant population and cultural practices, as well as weed species and intensity and insect, bird, and disease damage affecting sunflower production. In fall 2009, 177 sunflower fields were surveyed by 23 teams in six states (ND, SD, MN, KS, CO, and OK) and Manitoba. Results were mapped and placed on the NDSU website and are reported here for the economically important sunflower insect pests from 2009. Insecticide efficacy for 8 selected foliar insecticides was evaluated for control of banded sunflower moth and red sunflower seed weevil in a field trial in ND in 2009. All insecticide treatments had significantly less banded sunflower moth damage than the untreated check, except for one treatment. All insecticide treatments had significantly less red sunflower seed weevil damage than the untreated check, except for three treatments. However, results may not be an accurate reflection of insecticide efficacy, as populations of seed weevils and banded sunflower moth were very low. There were no significant differences in yield among treatments.

Technical Abstract: Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) are native to North America and a number of insect pests cause economic losses to sunflower production. Head-infesting insects include the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte, banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham, sunflower moth, Homoeosoma electellum (Hulst), and sunflower midge, Contarinia schulzi Gagne. Emerging pests include the sunflower seed maggot, (Loew), and Lygus bug. The NSA organizes an annual sunflower field survey to assess yield, cultural practices, as well as weed species and insect, bird, and disease damage affecting sunflower production. In 2009, 177 sunflower fields were surveyed by 23 teams in six states (ND, SD, MN, KS, CO, and OK) and Manitoba. Results were mapped and placed on the NDSU website and are reported here for the economically important sunflower insect pests from the 2009. A Sunflower Insect Trapping Network was coordinated by North Dakota State University (NDSU), USDA-ARS and the National Sunflower Association (NSA) for banded sunflower moth and sunflower moth using pheromone traps. Traps near sunflower fields were monitored weekly for moths. The trapping network provides an early pest warning system for sunflower moth, a migratory pest and also provides information on seasonal flight activity and pest alerts for banded sunflower moth. 39 cooperators from eight states (CO, KS, OK, ND, MN, NE, SD, and TX) and one Canadian Province (Manitoba) participated. Results from the 2009 trapping network were mapped and posted on the NSA website and then archived on the NDSU Extension Entomology IPM website. Insecticide efficacy for eight selected foliar insecticides was evaluated for control of banded sunflower moth and red sunflower seed weevil in a ND field trial in 2009. All insecticide treatments had significantly less banded sunflower moth damage than the untreated check, except for one treatment. All insecticide treatments had significantly less red sunflower seed weevil damage than the untreated check, except for three treatments. However, results may not be an accurate reflection of insecticide efficacy, as populations of seed weevils and banded sunflower moth were very low. No significant differences in yield were detected among treatments.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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