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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS OF ENHANCED EMBRYO, FETAL, AND NEONATAL DEVELOPMENT AND SURVIVAL IN SWINE Title: Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) measurement of changes in body composition of neonatal pigs

Authors
item Mitchell, Alva
item RAMSAY, TIMOTHY
item Taicher, G -
item Kovner, I -

Submitted to: Symposium on Energy and Protein Metabolism and Nutrition
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 10, 2010
Publication Date: September 6, 2010
Citation: Mitchell, A.D., Ramsay, T.G., Taicher, G., Kovner, I. 2010. Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) measurement of changes in body composition of neonatal pigs. Symposium on Energy and Protein Metabolism and Nutrition. (G.M. Crovetto, Ed.) EAAP 127:147-148. Wageningen Academic Purlishers. 3rd International Symposium on Engergy and Protein Metabolism, September 6-10, 2010, Parma, Italy.

Interpretive Summary: The survival of low birth weight pigs in particular may depend on energy stores in the body. The growth and composition of the neonatal pig is also of interest because of potential impact on subsequent growth and composition. Studies have found that factors such as birth weight and nutrition during the neonatal period can affect both growth and composition. Most studies have relied on chemical analysis of the carcass to measure composition (fat and lean) of the neonatal pig, thus the impact on subsequent composition can only be inferred. This study used QMR (quantitative magnetic resonance) as a new approach to measuring total body fat, lean and water. Since QMR is very rapid and does not require that the pig be anesthetized, these measurements can be made without interfering with the pig’s growth. The results of this study demonstrate that QMR is a useful method for measuring changes in body composition in neonatal pigs.

Technical Abstract: The survival of low birth weight pigs in particular may depend on energy stores in the body. QMR (quantitative magnetic resonance) is a new approach to measuring total body fat, lean and water. These measurements are based on quantifying protons associated with lipid and water molecules in the body. Since QMR is very rapid and does not require that the pig be anesthetized, these measurements can be made without interfering with the pig’s growth. In the calibration and validation phases of this study 50 pigs were scanned by QMR and the results were compared with those obtained by DXA and chemical analysis. The next phase involved the use of QMR to sequentially measure changes in the body composition of piglets during growth from birth to approximately 4 kg body weight. The results show that QMR can provide both accurate and precise measurement of total body fat, lean and water and can be used to measure the rates of fat and lean deposition in the live pig.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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