Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Detection of and Monitoring for Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Suburban and Sylvatic Habitats in North Central Florida using Four Sampling Techniques

Authors
item Obenauer, P. -
item Kaufman, P. -
item Kline, Daniel
item Allan, Sandra

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 28, 2010
Publication Date: January 9, 2010
Repository URL: http://DOI:10.1603/EN09322
Citation: Obenauer, P.J., Kaufman, P.E., Kline, D.L., Allan, S.A. 2010. Detection of and Monitoring for Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Suburban and Sylvatic Habitats in North Central Florida using Four Sampling Techniques. Environmental Entomology. 39(5):1608-1616.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian Tiger Mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is an invasive species that is currently the most pestiferous nuisance for humans in residential areas. While a variety of sampling methods and devices have been developed to improve detection and enumeration of mosquito populations, they are relatively uneffective for day active mosquitoes such as Aedes albopictus. In this study conducted in collaboration with USDA’s Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) in Gainesville (FL), four different sampling methods were evaluated in both suburban and residential sites. The most effective trap was the BG trap and landing counts provided the fastest method of sampling. Fewer Ae. albopictus were sampled from sylvatic habitats compared to suburban ones. These methods can form the basis for development of effective surveillance strategies for this mosquito species, facilitating reduction of human annoyance and potential threat of West Nile Virus transmission.

Technical Abstract: A sampling study using a BG-Sentinel trap baited with CO2, a gravid trap baited with an oak-pine infusion, a human subject and a vegetative aspirator was conducted to compare their reliability at detecting Ae. albopictus in suburban and sylvatic habitats. We collected 73,849 mosquitoes, representing 29 species from 11 genera over a twenty week period. The BG trap accounted for over 85% of all Ae. albopictus captured and was significantly more effective at detecting the presence of Ae. albopictus compared to the other three techniques. Landing-counts provided the fewest mosquito species (n = 10), yet provided a quick and effective weekly assessment of the major biting species and were the most effective method for sampling Ae. albopictus within a 10 min period. Fewer Ae. albopictus were sampled from sylvatic habitats compared to suburban ones. Sampling criteria advantageous for surveying Ae. albopictus and other mosquito species are discussed.

Last Modified: 4/15/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page