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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPACT OF EARLY DIETARY FACTORS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Dietary cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry affects the development of dyslipidemia and insulin insensitivity associated with metabolic syndrome in high fructose fed rats

Authors
item Khanal, Ramesh -
item Wilkes, Samuel -
item Rogers, Theo -
item Howard, Luke -
item Prior, Ronald

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 2010
Publication Date: April 12, 2010
Citation: Khanal, R., Wilkes, S., Rogers, T., Howard, L., Prior, R.L. 2010. Dietary cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry affects the development of dyslipidemia and insulin insensitivity associated with metabolic syndrome in high fructose fed rats [abstract]. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal. 24:920.2.

Technical Abstract: Effects of feeding cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry powder on selected parameters of metabolic syndrome were investigated in 40 growing male Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were divided into five dietary treatments of 1) control AIN93G diet, 2) high fructose (65% by weight, HF) diet, and 3-5) HF diet with 5% (dry weight) of cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry powder. Compared to control animals, HF reduced the body weight, abdominal fat, total liver lipids, and liver triglycerides. Urinary nitrate/nitrite excretion was not altered by diet (p < 0.05). There was no difference among treatments in fasting and postprandial plasma glucose, uric acid or cholesterol concentrations, but plasma triglycerides were increased by high fructose feeding in both fed and fasted states. All three berries reduced fasting (p < 0.01) but not postprandial plasma triglycerides. High fructose feeding increased fasting plasma insulin that was reduced by the berries. Homeostatic model of insulin resistance was increased by HF diet that was reduced by the berries, while that of beta cell function showed a tendency to be reduced by the berries (p < 0.09). HF feeding in a purified diet balanced for all nutrients did not produce a strong response in parameters associated with metabolic syndrome in growing rats, but all three berries were partially effective in ameliorating some of the metabolic disorders.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014