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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED PROCESSES FOR CUCUMBERS, CABBAGE, SWEETPOTATOES, AND PEPPERS TO MAKE HIGH QUALITY, NUTRITIOUS PRODUCTS AND REDUCE POLLUTION

Location: Food Science Research

Title: Sweetpotatoes

Authors
item TRUONG, VAN-DEN
item Avula, Ramesh -
item Pecota, Kenneth -
item Yencho, Craig -

Submitted to: Handbook of Vegetables and Vegetable Processing
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 27, 2009
Publication Date: January 1, 2011
Citation: Truong, V., Avula, R.Y., Pecota, K., Yencho, C.G. 2011. Sweetpotatoes. In: Sinha, N.K., editor. Handbook of vegetables & vegetable processing. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell. p. 717-737.

Interpretive Summary: The article on “Sweetpotatoes” is a chapter in the book entitled “Handbook of Vegetables and Vegetable Processing”, edited by Y. H. Hui, N. Sinha, J. Ahmed, E. O. Eyranuz and M. Siddig, and published by Blackwell-Wiley & Sons. The chapter covers various aspects of sweetpotato production including botany and physiology, genetics and breeding for varietal improvement, cultural practices, horticultural biochemistry, postharvest handling, storage conditions and packing operations for fresh root markets. The article also describes processing technologies to convert sweetpotatoes into food ingredients such as purees and flours/powders for food applications, various food products such as fried chips, French fries, canned and fermented products, and industrial products namely sugars, starch, natural colorants, chemicals and alcohol. Trends in sweetpotato production, consumption and the potential of this highly nutritious vegetable in meeting the demands on foods rich in carotene and polyphenolic compounds around the world are discussed.

Technical Abstract: With a wide adaptability, sweetpotatoes are growing in many countries around the world. They are ranked the fifth most important food crop in the tropics and seventh in world food production. Sweetpotatoes have high nutritional value and sensory versatility in terms of texture and flavor. Depending on the flesh color (white, cream, yellow, orange, purple), sweetpotatoes contain high levels of beta-carotene, anthocyanins, phenolics, dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other bioactive compounds. The beta-carotene in the orange-fleshed sweetpotatoes can play a significant role as a viable long-term food-based strategy for combating vitamin A deficiency around the world. Polyphenolics from purple-fleshed sweetpotatoes exhibited strong radical scavenging activity, which helps reduce the risk of stress-related diseases. This article reviews the recent developments in various aspects of sweetpotato production including botany and physiology, genetics and breeding for varietal improvement, cultural practices, horticultural biochemistry, postharvest handling, storage conditions and packing operations for fresh root markets. The article also describes processing technologies to convert sweetpotatoes into: 1) various food products e.g. fried chips, French fries, canned and fermented products; 2) functional food ingredients such as purees and flours/powders for food applications; and 3) industrial products namely sugars, starch, natural colorants, chemicals and alcohol. Trends in sweetpotato production, consumption and the potential of this highly nutritious vegetable in meeting the demands on foods rich in carotene and polyphenolic compounds around the world are discussed.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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