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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTER AND PIERCE'S DISEASE

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Transmission of bacterial plant pathogens by Hemipteran vectors: The intersection of genomics and classical vector biology

Authors
item Bextine, B -
item Hunter, Wayne
item Hail, D -
item Spencer, K -

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 14, 2009
Publication Date: January 9, 2010
Citation: Bextine, B.R., Hunter, W.B., Hail, D., Spencer, K. 2010. Transmission of bacterial plant pathogens by Hemipteran vectors: The intersection of genomics and classical vector biology [abtract]. Plant and Animal Genome XVIII Conference, January 9-13, 2010, San Diego, California, p. 18.

Technical Abstract: Insects that are classified in the Order Hemiptera have become one of the most important plant-associated insect taxa, mainly because of their ability to transmit plant pathogens. The glassy-winged sharpshooter is the primary vector of the plant-infecting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapevine. The potato psyllid, another hemipteran insect, is the primary vector of the plant-infecting Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum, the causal agent of Zebra Chip of Potato. The Asian Citrus Psyllid, yet another hemipteran insect, is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of huanglongbing which is devastating citrus production worldwide. The study of these insects at the genomic and epigenomic level can provide basic biological information towards understanding the genetic basis of disease epidemiology, insecticide resistance, and the insect/bacterium/plant interactions. With this increased understanding more effective management strategies of these pests and diseases will be developed.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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