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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ORGANIC AND REDUCED INPUT FRESH MARKET SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION SYSTEMS FOR THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS Title: Irrigation timing and fertilizer rate in peppers

Author
item Russo, Vincent

Submitted to: Proceedings of Horticultural Industry Show
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 2010
Publication Date: March 1, 2010
Citation: Russo, V.M. 2010. Irrigation timing and fertilizer rate in peppers. In: Proceedings of the 29th Annual Horticulture Industries Show, January 8-9, 2010, Tulsa, Oklahoma. p. 157-158.

Interpretive Summary: Environmental conditions can affect crop production. However, growers of pepper (Capsicum sp.) will have to adjust to conditions so that production quality and quantity are maintained. In Oklahoma the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons have been noteworthy due to higher than usual amounts of precipitation. This might lead growers to withhold irrigation on the assumption that there is sufficient water stored in the soil to support production. When precipitation is higher than normal fertilizer could be leached beyond the root zone. The same amount of irrigation was applied either once or twice a week, or no irrigation was applied. Air temperature might affect production. Irrigation was applied at times of the day when temperatures would be different, 10AM or 2PM. Fertilizer was applied at 150 or 300 lb/acre of triple 17 NPK, the lower rate is the recommended rate. Bell, cv. Jupiter, and non-pungent jalapeno, cv. Pace 105, peppers, both C. annuum L., were used. It was not necessary to provide additional fertilizer since fertilizer rate did not affect yield. Time of day when irrigation was applied did not affect yield. Irrigation produced marketable yields that were 2- to 3-times greater than no irrigation. Irrigation twice a week produced marketable yields for bell pepper that were 2.2-times greater than irrigation once a week. For non-pungent jalapeno peppers more frequent irrigation produced yields that were 1.4-times greater. It is necessary to maintain irrigation even when precipitation levels are above normal.

Technical Abstract: Excessive rain fall might leach nutrients from the soil or cause producers to not supply irrigation to pepper (Capsicum sp.). Fertilizer at 150 or 300 lb/acre of triple 17 NPK, the lower rate is the recommended rate, was supplied to either bell, cv. Jupiter, or non-pungent jalapeno, cv. Pace 105, peppers, both C. annuum L. Irrigation was either not applied, or the same amount of irrigation was applied either once or twice weekly at times in the day when air temperatures would be different, 10AM or 2PM. Fertilizer rate and time of day when irrigation was applied did not affect yield. Irrigation produced marketable yields that were 2- to 3-times greater than no irrigation. Irrigation twice a week produced marketable yields for bell pepper that were 2.2-times greater than irrigation once a week. For non-pungent jalapeno peppers more frequent irrigation produced yields that were 1.4-times greater. Additional fertilizer is not, but irrigation is, necessary to maintain yields even when precipitation levels are above normal.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014
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