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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND GENETIC BASIS OF POSTHARVEST QUALITY, DISEASE CONTROL, AND PHYTONUTRIENT CONTENT OF SELECTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Title: Low and high input organic mulching trial

Authors
item Davis, Angela
item Webber, Charles
item Shrefler, James -
item Taylor, Merritt -

Submitted to: Proceedings of Horticultural Industry Show
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 2010
Publication Date: March 1, 2010
Citation: Davis, A.R., Webber III, C.L., Shrefler, J.W., Taylor, M. 2010. Low and high input organic mulching trial. In: Proceedings of the 29th Annual Horticulture Industries Show, January 8-9, 2010, Tulsa, Oklahoma. p. 145-147.

Interpretive Summary: Many consumers consider organically grown produce a healthier and safer option over conventionally grown crops. Because of this, consumers are often willing to pay more for organically grown produce. However, production of organic fruits, vegetables, and herbs can be challenging, especially in climates where weed, insect and disease control is difficult. Knowing which organic production methods works best for our region is imperative for a good harvest. Unfortunately, there is limited information on specific organic production methods that do well in Oklahoma and Arkansas. Because of this, production characteristics of four mulching schemes were tested in Southeastern Oklahoma in 2009. Comparisons were made to determine which mulches perform best on multiple herbs and vegetables.

Technical Abstract: Many consumers consider organically grown produce a healthier and safer option over conventionally grown crops. Because of this, consumers are often willing to pay more for organically grown produce. However, production of organic fruits, vegetables, and herbs can be challenging, especially in climates where weed, insect and disease control is difficult. Knowing which organic production methods works best for our region is imperative for a good harvest. Unfortunately, there is limited information on specific organic production methods that do well in Oklahoma and Arkansas. Because of this, production characteristics of four mulching schemes were tested in Southeastern Oklahoma in 2009. Comparisons were made to determine which mulches perform best on multiple herbs and vegetables. Plastic mulch and bare ground gave overall highest plant weights. Rye and rye plus paper gave overall lower yields. An exceptionally wet year may have been the cause for poor yield in the heavily mulched rows. This is the first of a multiyear study.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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