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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE RANGELAND PRODUCTION

Location: Livestock and Range Research Laboratory (LARRL)

Title: Trapping Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) with Pheromone Baited Multiple-Funnel Traps to Reduce Tree Mortality

Authors
item Progar, R -
item Sturdevant, N -
item RINELLA, MATTHEW

Submitted to: Pan-Pacific Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2010
Publication Date: October 1, 2010
Citation: Progar, R.A., Sturdevant, N., Rinella, M.J. 2010. Trapping Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) with Pheromone Baited Multiple-Funnel Traps to Reduce Tree Mortality. Pan-Pacific Entomologist. 86(4):111-118.

Interpretive Summary: Douglas fir beetle (DFB) causes considerable mortality to Douglas fir in western North American forests. We evaluated the ability of pheromone-baited traps to protect small, high-value stands of trees, such as those occurring in campgrounds, rest areas, and small parks. At two sites in western Montana in 2004, treated plots were surrounded by three trapping stations arranged in an equilateral triangle (200 m per triangle side). Similar, untreated plots were used for comparison. 2.1 million DFB were trapped and removed from treated areas during 2004. Despite this, there was no evidence that trapping protected Douglas-fir at either site. Conversely, the ratio of infested to living trees increased substantially due to trapping at one of the sites but was not strongly affected by trapping at the other site. Moreover, in the plots where trapping increased mortality in 2004, beetle-caused mortality remained elevated in 2005. Placing pheromones adjacent to the plots appeared to attract beetles from an expansive area. Though lured near the traps, large numbers of beetles did not enterthe trapsandconsequentlyattackedtrees in the plots. adjacent to the traps. Positioning pheromone traps immediately adjacent to high-value Douglas fir stands does not appear to reduce beetle infestation and sometimes increases it.

Technical Abstract: Douglas fir beetle (Dendroctonuspseudotsugae Hopkins) (DFB) causes considerable mortality to Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in western North American forests. We evaluated the ability of pheromone-baited multiple-funnel traps to protect small, high-value stands of trees, such as those occurring in campgrounds, rest areas, and small parks. At two sites in western Montana in 2004, treated plots were surrounded by three trapping stations arranged in an equilateral triangle (200 m per triangle side). Similar, untreated plots were used for comparison. 2.1 million OFB were trapped and removed from treated areas during 2004. Despite this, there was no evidence that trapping protected Douglas-fir at either site. Conversely, the ratio of infested to living trees increased substantially due to trapping at one of the sites but was not strongly affected by trapping at the other site. Moreover, in the plots where trapping increased mortality in 2004, beetle-caused mortality remained elevated in 2005. Placing pheromones adjacent to the plots appeared to attract beetles from an expansive area. Though lured near the traps, large numbers of beetles did not enter the traps and consequently attacked trees in the plots adjacent to the traps. Positioning pheromone traps immediately adjacent to high-value Douglas fir stands does not appear to reduce beetle infestation and sometimes increases it.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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