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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Temperature studies with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama: cold hardiness and temperature thresholds for oviposition

Authors
item Hall, David
item Wenninger, Erik -
item Hentz, Matthew

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 2, 2010
Publication Date: July 20, 2011
Citation: Hall, D.G., Wenninger, E.J., Hentz, M.G. 2011. Temperature studies with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama: cold hardiness and temperature thresholds for oviposition. Journal of Insect Science. 11:83 available online: insectscience.org/11.83.

Interpretive Summary: A study was conducted to obtain information on the cold hardiness of the Asian citrus psyllid and to assess upper and lower temperature thresholds for egg-laying by the psyllid. The psyllid is an important pest in citrus because it transmits the bacterial pathogens responsible for citrus greening disease, considered the most serious citrus disease worldwide. The psyllid was first found in Florida during 1998, and the disease was discovered during 2005. Little was known regarding cold hardiness of the psyllid, but Florida citrus is occasionally subjected to notable freeze events. Of interest is the impact that a freeze might have on population levels of the psyllid. Research results indicated that adult Asian citrus psyllids become cold-acclimated during the winter through exposure to cooler winter temperatures. There was no evidence that eggs became cold-acclimated during winter. Research with adult psyllids from a laboratory colony revealed that mild to moderate freeze events should usually be sub-lethal to the psyllid irrespective of whether the psyllid is cold acclimated or not. Upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition were investigated because such information may be valuable in explaining the geographic distribution and potential spread of the pest as well as how cooler winter temperatures might limit population growth. The estimated lower and upper thresholds for oviposition were 16.0 and 41.6°C, respectively; the estimated temperature of peak oviposition over a 48-h period was 29.6°C.

Technical Abstract: A study was conducted to obtain information on the cold hardiness of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), and to assess upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition. The psyllid is an important pest in citrus because it transmits the bacterial pathogens responsible for citrus greening disease, considered the most serious citrus disease worldwide. The psyllid was first found in Florida during 1998, and the disease was discovered during 2005. Little was known regarding cold hardiness of the psyllid, but Florida citrus is occasionally subjected to notable freeze events. Of interest is the impact that a freeze might have on population levels of the psyllid. Research results indicated that adult Asian citrus psyllids become cold-acclimated during the winter through exposure to cooler winter temperatures. Adult females generally appeared to cold acclimate to a greater extent than adult males. There was no evidence that eggs became cold-acclimated during winter. Cold acclimation in nymphs was not investigated. Research with adult psyllids from a laboratory colony revealed that mild to moderate freeze events should usually be sub-lethal to the psyllid irrespective of whether the psyllid is cold acclimated or not. Upper and lower temperature thresholds for oviposition were investigated because such information may be valuable in explaining the geographic distribution and potential spread of the pest as well as how cooler winter temperatures might limit population growth. The estimated lower and upper thresholds for oviposition were 16.0 and 41.6°C, respectively; the estimated temperature of peak oviposition over a 48-h period was 29.6°C.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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