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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC BASES FOR THE BIOCHEMICAL DETERMINANTS OF WHEAT QUALITY Title: Can Host Plant Resistance Protect the Quality of Wheat from Fusarium Head Blight?

Authors
item Souza, Edward
item Mundell, Nicki -
item Sarti, Daniela -
item Balut, Ana -
item Dong, Yanhong -
item Van Sanford, Dave -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2009
Publication Date: December 9, 2009
Citation: Souza, E.J., Mundell, N., Sarti, D., Balut, A., Dong, Y., Van Sanford, D. 2009. Can Host Plant Resistance Protect the Quality of Wheat from Fusarium Head Blight?.Proceedings of US Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative, Dec 7-9, 2009, Orlando Florida. Poster #65, Pg 154.

Interpretive Summary: In 2009, the Logan County, KY, wheat trial had extended conditions for infection with FHB resulting in extensive and uniform infection within the trial. FHB disease incidence and field grain yield were recorded. We evaluated the quality of the grain at the Soft Wheat Quality Laboratory. Generally the results correlated to known resistance levels with resistant cultivars having fewer scabby or srivelled grains. The percent of aspirated seed was negatively correlated to field yield and test weight, and was positively correlated to field infection. Effects of infection on end-use quality varied for the cultivars and will be discussed in greater detail.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium head blight (FHB) infection reduces the amount of millable grain from an infected field, reduces mill yields, and generally degrades end-use quality. In 2009, the Logan County, KY, wheat trial had extended conditions for infection with FHB resulting in extensive and uniform infection within the trial. FHB disease incidence and field grain yield were recorded. The trials were harvested and evaluated for percent of millable grain, milling yield and soft wheat quality using standard methods of the American Association of Cereal Chemistry. Four field replications of samples were weighed before and after aspiration; after aspiration the four replications were combined to form two replications for milling and baking evaluation. Cultivars differed for the amount of grain aspirated during cleaning (Cultivar F-value>22) with Coker 9511 having the smallest loss due to aspiration (3.4% removed) and SS 8641 having the greatest aspiration removal (74.4% removed). Generally the results correlated to known resistance levels with resistant cultivars having fewer scabby or srivelled grains. The percent of aspirated seed was negatively correlated to field yield (r>-0.25*) and test weight (r>-0. 87***), and was positively correlated to field infection (r>0.63***). Effects of infection on end-use quality varied for the cultivars and will be discussed in greater detail.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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