Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ROLE OF DIETARY SELENIUM ON GENE EXPRESSION, CELL CYCLE AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS IN CANCER RISK Title: Methylselenol, a Selenium Metabolite, Plays Common and Different Roles in Colonic Cancer and Nontumorigenic Colonic Cell Growth

Authors
item Zeng, Huawei
item Briske Anderson, Mary
item Moyer, Mary -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2009
Publication Date: April 24, 2010
Repository URL: http://www.fasebj.org
Citation: Zeng, H., Briske Anderson, M.J., Moyer, M.P. 2010. Methylselenol, a Selenium Metabolite, Plays Common and Different Roles in Colonic Cancer and Nontumorigenic Colonic Cell Growth. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 24:916.5.

Technical Abstract: There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as cancer-chemopreventive compounds, and methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. To determine differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on colon cancer cells versus normal colon cells, colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and nontumorigenic colon NCM460 cells were exposed to methylselenol. We found that submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase. In addition, methylselenol inhibited the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling and c-Myc expression. Importantly, methylselenol showed greater inhibition of cell growth, cell cycle, ERK1/2 signal and c-Myc expression in colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells, as compared to NCM460 colon cells. Similarly, submicromolar methylselenol induced higher apoptosis rate in HCT-116 cells (up to 3.2 fold of the control) than that in NCM460 colon cells (up to 1.4 fold of the control). Taken together, our data demonstrate that methylselenol’s stronger potential of inhibiting colon cancer cell proliferation when compared with normal colon cells, which may be a critical mechanism by which selenium exerts its anticancer property.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page