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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NUTRITION, EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY, AND SARCOPENIA Title: Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis

Authors
item Layne, Jennifer -
item Arabelovic, Senada -
item Wilson, Lynn Barios -
item Cloutier, Gregory -
item Pindrus, Mariya -
item Mallio, Charlotte -
item Roubenoff, Ronen -
item Castaneda-Sceppa, Carmen -

Submitted to: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 20, 2009
Publication Date: November 1, 2009
Citation: Layne, J.E., Arabelovic, S., Wilson, L., Cloutier, G.J., Pindrus, M.A., Mallio, C.J., Roubenoff, R., Castaneda-Sceppa, C. 2009. Community-based strength training improves physical function in older women and arthritis. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 3(6):466-473.

Interpretive Summary: Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report that they do not dedicate leisure time to physical activity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physical function among adults with arthritis. The authors of this paper conducted a mul¬tisite, pilot randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of community-based strength training versus usual activity in women 55 years of age and older with arthritis. The moderate-intensity, progressive strength training intervention included balance and flexibility exercises. Classes met 2 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included muscle strength, performance-based physical function (mobility, flexibility, and balance), and arthritis symptoms. The study found that there were no adverse effects on arthri¬tis symptoms. These results demon¬strate the efficacy of this program and its potential to be disseminated as an evidence-based strength training inter¬vention to improve physical function and strength among older women with arthritis and other major comorbidities.

Technical Abstract: Exercise is recognized as a mainstay treatment of arthritis, yet more than 40% of adults with arthritis report no leisure time physical activity participation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to identify and promote evidence-based physical activity programs to improve physical function among adults with arthritis. The authors conducted a mul¬tisite, pilot randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of community-based strength training versus usual activity in women (n = 33) 55 years of age and older with arthritis. The moderate-intensity, progressive strength training intervention included balance and flexibility exercises. Classes met 2 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included muscle strength, performance-based physical function (mobility, flexibility, and balance), and arthritis symptoms. Lower body strength improved from baseline to 12 weeks in the strength training versus con¬trol group (32.2%-7.3%, respectively; P = .004). Physical function improved in the strength training group over 12 weeks (range, 7%-50%; P < .05), with no change in control group. Adherence to the intervention was 82% ± 16%. There were no adverse effects on arthri¬tis symptoms. These results demon¬strate the efficacy of this program and its potential to be disseminated as an evidence-based strength training inter¬vention to improve physical function and strength among older women with arthritis and other major comorbidities.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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