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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Limited field establishment of a weed biocontrol agent, Floracarus perrepae (Acariformes: Eriophyidae), against Old World climbing fern in Florida - a possible role of mite resistant plant genotypes

Authors
item Boughton, Anthony
item Pemberton, Robert

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 27, 2011
Publication Date: December 15, 2011
Citation: Boughton, A.J., Pemberton, R.W. 2011. Limited field establishment of a weed biocontrol agent, Floracarus perrepae (Acariformes: Eriophyidae), against Old World climbing fern in Florida - a possible role of mite resistant plant genotypes. Environmental Entomology. (40):1448-1457.

Interpretive Summary: Floracarus perrepae was released on Lygodium microphyllum in 63 plots at five sites in South Florida during 2008. Mite-induced leaf galls or feeding damage were observed on field plants in 34 of these plots. Leaf galls were observed in six plots, but in only two of these plots did mites establish persistent populations that successfully over wintered. Foliar nitrogen content was evaluated as a possible factor limiting broader establishment of the mite, but results showed that nitrogen levels were not different in galled plants versus plants that did not support galling, or in field plants versus potted plants, indicating that nitrogen was not responsible. The failure of F. perrepae to establish more broadly appears to be due to the existence of resistant genotypes within L. microphyllum populations in Florida, that are not susceptible to galling by the introduced strain of the mite.

Technical Abstract: Floracarus perrepae was released on Lygodium microphyllum in 63 plots at five sites in South Florida during 2008. Mite-induced leaf galls or feeding damage were observed on field plants in 34 of these plots. Leaf galls were observed in six plots, but in only two of these plots did mites establish persistent populations that successfully over wintered. Foliar nitrogen content was evaluated as a possible factor limiting broader establishment of the mite, but results showed that nitrogen levels were not different in galled plants versus plants that did not support galling, or in field plants versus potted plants, indicating that nitrogen was not responsible. The failure of F. perrepae to establish more broadly appears to be due to the existence of resistant genotypes within L. microphyllum populations in Florida, that are not susceptible to galling by the introduced strain of the mite.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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