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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biology and reproductive parameters of the brown lygodium moth, Neomusotima conspurcatalis - a new biological control agent of Old World climbing fern in Florida

Authors
item Boughton, Anthony
item Pemberton, Robert

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 2, 2011
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Boughton, A.J., Pemberton, R.W. 2012. Biology and reproductive parameters of the brown lygodium moth, Neomusotima conspurcatalis - a new biological control agent of Old World climbing fern in Florida Environmental Entomology. 41:308-316.

Interpretive Summary: The average duration of the egg, larval and pupal stage of Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) at 25oC was 7, 10, and 5 days respectively. Larvae generally molted through five instars. The sex ratio was male-biased, averaging 1:0.8 (':'). Both sexes emerged at the same time. Female moths typically mated once, on the first night after emergence, and began oviposition on the next night. Female moths lived an average of 10.7 ± 0.8 days and laid about half their eggs on the first night after mating. Single females mated in cages with a male-biased sex ratio (3':1') produced significantly more larvae over their lifetime (140 ± 6.6 larvae) than females mated at a ratio of 1':1' (111 ± 9.1 larvae), despite the fact that there were no differences in number of matings, oviposition duration or longevity between the two groups.

Technical Abstract: The average duration of the egg, larval and pupal stage of Neomusotima conspurcatalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) at 25oC was 7, 10, and 5 days respectively. Larvae generally molted through five instars. The sex ratio was male-biased, averaging 1:0.8 (':'). Both sexes emerged at the same time. Female moths typically mated once, on the first night after emergence, and began oviposition on the next night. Female moths lived an average of 10.7 ± 0.8 days and laid about half their eggs on the first night after mating. Single females mated in cages with a male-biased sex ratio (3':1') produced significantly more larvae over their lifetime (140 ± 6.6 larvae) than females mated at a ratio of 1':1' (111 ± 9.1 larvae), despite the fact that there were no differences in number of matings, oviposition duration or longevity between the two groups.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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