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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPACT OF EARLY DIETARY FACTORS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH

Location: Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center

Title: Processing and storage effects on procyanidin composition and concentration of processed blueberry products

Authors
item Brownmiller, Cindi -
item Howard, Luke -
item Prior, Ronald

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 13, 2009
Publication Date: March 15, 2009
Citation: Brownmiller, C., Howard, L.R., Prior, R.L. 2009. Processing and storage effects on procyanidin composition and concentration of processed blueberry products. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 57(5):1896-1902.

Interpretive Summary: Blueberries are a rich source of a number of phytochemicals that may contribute to the reduced risk of chronic disease; however due to seasonal availability the blueberries are commonly consumed in processed forms after some period of storage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing and storage on procyanidins in blueberries. Procyanidins are a class of compounds that exist in multiple forms as a single unit or multiple units linked together which are termed oligomers or polymers. Blueberries that were 1) canned-in-syrup, 2) canned-in-water, 3) pureed, which involves homogenizing, heating, and adding corn syrup, and 4) juiced were studied. Processing blueberries into various forms resulted in significant losses of total procyanidins, with only 19% to 23% being retained in juices, 41% retained in purees and 65% and 78% being retained in berries canned in syrup and berries canned in water, respectively. The monomers and dimers were retained to a much greater extent than larger oligomers in all products following processing. Procyanidins were further degraded during 6 months of storage. The loss of procyanidins during processing and storage points out the need to develop methods that retain more of these compounds.

Technical Abstract: Blueberries are a rich source of procyanidins that may contribute to the reduced risk of chronic disease; however due to seasonal availability the berries are commonly consumed in thermally processed forms after long term-term storage. In this study we evaluated the effects of processing and 6 months storage on procyanidin composition and content of blueberries that were canned-in-syrup (CS), canned-in-water (CW), pureed, and juiced (non-clarified and clarified). Processing blueberries into various forms resulted in significant losses of total procyanidins, with only 19% and 23% being retained in non-clarified and clarified juices, 41% retained in purees and 65% and 78% being retained in berries CS and berries CW. The monomers and dimers were retained to a much greater extent than larger oligomers in all products following processing. Procyanidins were further degraded during 6 months storage, with only 11% and 12% retained in clarified and non-clarified juices, 7% retained in purees, and 22% and 32% retained in berries CS and CW. Similar to results obtained following processing, monomers and dimers were better retained than larger oligomers.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014